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Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159)

Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159)


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Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159)

This picture of the Wickes class destroyer USS Schenck (DD-159), taken in 1919-20, shows her with an awning erected over the side of the ship to shelter the wardroom and captain's cabin.

U.S. Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History, Norman Friedmann .The standard history of the development of American destroyers, from the earliest torpedo boat destroyers to the post-war fleet, and covering the massive classes of destroyers built for both World Wars. Gives the reader a good understanding of the debates that surrounded each class of destroyer and led to their individual features.


Avenue of Heroes: Four-Star Admiral Charles Duncan

Four-Star Admiral Charles Duncan, Banner Location: Fourth & Palm, Coronado, CA

Admiral Duncan called his 16 months in Coronado, a “personal and professional pleasure.” Admiral Duncan served in WWII, Korea, and Vietnam. The teenage fascination with boats in the 1920’s led him to become one of only 220 commissioned Four-Star Admirals in the history of the U.S. Navy. His passion for ships continued. Their namesakes provided examples in heroism and diplomacy that he modeled.

Charles Kenney Duncan was born in Nicholasville, Kentucky, on December 7, 1911 to a family that highly valued education. His mother was a professor at the University of Kentucky, a university that initially would not accept women. He attended University High School in Lexington followed by the Kavanaugh Preparatory School. Charles attended the United States Naval Academy, graduating in 1933.

In 1938, after serving on USS Salt Lake City, he served in the Atlantic aboard destroyer USS Schenck (DD-159). He wrote about the significant impact that early good training had on he and his shipmates. Within two years he was assigned to the staff of Commander Destroyers, Atlantic Fleet, when it was first formed and WWII was heating up.

While delivering 50 destroyers to assist the British Royal Navy in Nova Scotia he met his first wife Sheila, whom he married in 1941 in Bermuda, just as Hitler invaded the Soviet Union.

War must have seemed far away to Duncan, who was first executive officer of USS Hutchins in the Pacific—that all changed just before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, when hundreds of Japanese fighter planes attacked Honolulu’s Pearl Harbor.

By August Duncan was assigned to the Destroyer Charles Wilson to protect US Marines unloading by night at Savo Island, near Guadalcanal. Cruisers USS Vincennes, Astoria, Quincy, and fellow Destroyer Helm had conducted a box-shaped patrol between the Tulagi and Savo Island to defend the passage. The Japanese attacked these cruisers as their captains slept, ending in their sinking, igniting Neptune’s Inferno—raging fires on the water. It was all over in one grueling hour.

Duncan’s Destroyer Wilson raced to their aid with bombardment and anti-aircraft engagement, then dramatically and selflessly rescued survivors. Duncan witnessed blood and oil covered survivors struggling in the fiery water falling victim to the sharks. This horror deeply affected him. US losses amounted to 1,077 killed and 709 wounded. The catastrophe at Savo Island was the worst defeat ever suffered by the Navy.

While Neptune’s Fires raged at sea, stranded marines awaited help that was not coming.

A young serviceman wrote, “We have been bombed every day by airplanes, and a submarine shells us every now and then. Our foxholes are four-foot deep. We go out on night patrols and it’s plenty rugged. We lay in the foxholes for 13 to 14 hours at a clip and keep firing at the Japs in the jungle. As yet, there is no air support. The mosquitoes are very bad at night. The ants and flies bother us continually. The planes strafed the beach today. A big naval battle ensued the second day we were here, which resulted in our ship…being sunk. All of our belongings were lost.”

For his heroic actions, Duncan was awarded the Navy Commendation medal with Combat “V” and a Gold Star with Combat “V” in lieu of a second award. Duncan also saw the carrier USS Wasp sunk by Japanese forces.

Because of his leadership, Duncan was assigned to progressively more important positions. He was a member of “Holloway Board” that led to the Navy Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (NROTC) providing a path for college graduates to Officer Candidate School.

By 1945, the Soviet Union had invaded Korea. Japanese troops surrendered to the Russians in North Korea and to Americans in South Korea. WWII ended causing a shortage of equipment, ships, and experienced personnel. This concerned Duncan, now Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet. He warned Congress to continue mine fields on both coasts. His argument was ignored and he stated later that the US “never pays much attention in peacetime to the passive or less glamorous weapon systems.”

Charles Duncan was promoted to Rear Admiral in the summer of 1958, five years after the end of the Korean Conflict. He was assigned Commander Amphibious Group One (1958-59). That same year Rear Admiral Speck turned over the entire Pacific Fleet Amphibious Training Command to Duncan at Coronado Naval Amphibious Base (NAB).

Duncan made important strides in international relations while residing in Coronado. He entertained 28 allied officers training at NAB as guests of the Coronado Rotary Club. Rotary president was Dr. James Vernetti. Duncan noticed that Vice Admiral Liu Kwang-Kai, Commander-in-Chief of the Nationalist Chinese Navy, and other dignitaries had a distorted view of Americans because of motion pictures. Duncan’s goal was to show them the real way Americans lived.

The following year, on July 4, 1960, Admiral and Sheila Duncan rode in the Coronado Fourth of July Parade and were honored at a luncheon by Mayor and Mrs. Robin Goodenough.

The Vietnam conflict took Duncan away from Coronado for assignment near strife torn Laos to command of Naval Base Subic Bay in the Philippines. He assumed command of Rear Admiral Spring, who was killed in an air crash. His social abilities were again highlighted when he was elected president of a Philippines charitable association and vice president of the Philippines Tubercular Association. He was so loved by the locals that he became an “adopted son” of both Bataan and Zambales.

Duncan had a part in addressing under-representation of African Americans in officer positions when he served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations and Chief of Naval Personnel. President John F. Kennedy commented that his 1961 inaugural parade had few black officers. Duncan’s special assistant, Lt. Commander Norm Johnson, an African American, was assigned to ensure policies for African American advancement in the military were implemented.

President Johnson nominated Duncan as Vice Admiral, relieving Vice Admiral McCain, namesake of the road exiting Naval Air Station North Island at Fourth Street.

Vice Admiral Duncan then held a sequence of Atlantic Fleet commands: the Atlantic Fleet Cruiser-Destroyer Force (1964-65) the Atlantic Fleet Amphibious Force (1967-68) the US Second Fleet and NATO’s Striking Fleet Atlantic (1967-68). For his heroism as Commander Amphibious Force, he was awarded the Legion of Merit.

In 1967, he met his friend Vice Admiral William I. Martin at sea during the first time ever in US Navy history that flagships of “both the Second Fleet and Sixth Fleets refueled simultaneously while steaming in the Mediterranean Sea (USS Springfield—flagship of Duncan, and USS Little Rock—flagship of Martin.)” It was the first time in many years the two three-star Fleet Commanders were together to discuss operations.

On September 30, 1970, Admiral Charles K. Duncan was appointed NATO’s seventh Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic, to succeed Admiral Ephraim P. Holmes. He also became Commander-in-Chief Atlantic (the United States Unified Command). In that position he conducted the largest ever NATO naval exercises and received the Award of the Grand Cross of the Order of Orange Nassau with Swords from the Queen of the Netherlands and the Grand Cross of the Order of AVIS (the oldest military order) in Portugal.

By 1971, this one time Ensign had become Commander and Chief of the Atlantic Fleet. He retired the following year, on November 1, 1972, in the grade of Four-Star Admiral.

His service to country and community did not stop there. His postwar assignments included battleship executive officer commanding officer of an amphibious ship command of a destroyer division and operations officer of the U.S. Pacific Fleet.

During this period, in the midst of Vietnam objectors, he held fast his commitment to service to one’s nation in the face of controversy by tackling hard issues such as drug use by US forces and Harvard students using the ROTC program to avoid the draft.

In the spring of 1974, he was installed in Athens as honorary President of the Greek National Organization Encouraging NATO’s Aims.

Upon retirement, he moved to the country near Leesburg, Virginia, living there until January 1977. He continued his deeply held value of service as a member of Secretary of the Navy’s Advisory Board on Education and Training – and served on the Board of Advisors to the President, U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.

He then decided to return to his favorite post and became a full-time resident of Coronado.

In 1981, Duncan became a member of the Board of Trustees of the San Diego Museum of Art and was soon elected as a member of France’s Académie de Marine.

In 1985, Admiral Duncan was referenced in “The Golden Thirteen: Recollections of the First Black Naval Officers.” He was quoted in “Against the Tide: Rickover’s Leadership Principles and the Rise of the Nuclear Navy,” regarding Admiral Rickover who pushed to use the power of the atom bomb in the first nuclear-powered submarine, USS Nautilus. Duncan is pointed out in “More Than a Uniform: A Navy Woman in a Navy Man’s World” as one of the finest military leaders in the world.

Duncan continued to balance military service with social activities. Perhaps that was key to his success as a naval officer. He was a member of the Chevy Chase Club and an active Episcopalian. He maintained his ties with Lexington, Kentucky and was named a Kentucky Colonel, and inducted into the Hall of Distinguished Alumni. It was while visiting his old Kentucky home he met his second wife, Jean Keyser, whom he married in December 1986 in Coronado, where she still resides.

Admiral Duncan died June 27, 1994. He had two adopted children, Anne and Bruce, and two stepchildren, Casey and Amy.

USS SLC Association Newsletter (1996-1997): n. pag. Print.

Oliver, Dave. Against the Tide: Rickover’s Leadership Principles and the Rise of the Nuclear Navy. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.

Duncan, Charles K. The Reminiscences Of Admiral Charles K. Duncan, U.S. Navy (Ret.). 2015. radio.

“Charles K. Duncan-Personal Page.” Charles K. Duncan-Personal Page. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Historical San Diego Newspaper

Stillwell, Paul. The Golden Thirteen. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1993. Print.

Collins, Winifred Quick, and Herbert M Levine. More Than A Uniform. Denton, Tex.: University of North Texas Press, 1997. Print.

San Diego Union,. ‘Duncan Assumes Command’. 1961: 20. Print.

San Diego Union,. ‘San Diego Union Sept 24, 1959’. 1959: Vice Admiral of Nationalist Chinese Navy in Coronado. Print.

San Diego Union,. ‘Chinese Navy At NAB For Training’. 1959: n. pag. Print.


  • Ardito (   Regia Marina): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The minesweeper was bombed and sunk at Bari, Italy by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Aube (   France): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Barletta (   Regia Marina): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The auxiliary cruiser was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Bollsta (   Norway): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft with the loss of five of her 30 crew. She was raised in 1948, repaired and entered Italian service as Stefano M. ΐ]
  • Cassala (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship bombed and damaged at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. She was declared a constructive total loss. ΐ]
  • Corfu (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship bombed and damaged at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. She was declared a constructive total loss. ΐ]
  • Devon Coast (   United Kingdom): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The coaster was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Fort Athabasca (   Canada): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Fort ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. Α]
  • Fort Lajoie (   Canada): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Fort ship was bombed and sunk by the Luftwaffe at Bari.
  • Frosinone (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Genespesca II (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Goggiam (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship bombed and damaged at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. She was declared a constructive total loss. ΐ]
  • Inaffondabile (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The schooner was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft.
  • John Bascom (   United States):World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Liberty ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. The wreck was scrapped in 1948. Β]
  • John Harvey (   United States): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Liberty ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. The wreck was scrapped in 1948. Β]
  • John L. Motley (   United States):World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Liberty ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. Β]
  • Joseph Wheeler (   United States): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Liberty ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. The wreck was scrapped in 1948. Γ]
  • Lars Kruse (   United Kingdom): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • USS LCT-242 (   United States Navy): World War II: The Landing Craft, Tank was torpedoed and sunk off Naples, Italy. Δ]
  • Lom (   Norway): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft with the loss of four of her 32 crew. Ε]
  • Luciano Orlando (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Lwów (   Poland): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • MB 10 13 (   Regia Marina): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The boat was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Norlom (   Norway): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. She was refloated in November 1946 and scrapped at Bari in 1947.
  • Porto Pisano (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The coaster was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Puck (   Poland): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Samuel J. Tilden (   United States): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The Liberty ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. The wreck was scrapped in 1948. Ζ]
  • Testbank (   United Kingdom): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship was bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Volodda (   Kingdom of Italy): World War II: Air Raid on Bari: The cargo ship bombed and sunk at Bari by Luftwaffe aircraft. ΐ]
  • Azuma Maru (   Japan): World War II: The cargo liner was torpedoed and sunk in the Molucca Passage by USS Tinosa (   United States Navy). Η]
  • Touchet (   United States): World War II: The Type T2-SE-A2 tanker was torpedoed and sunk in the Gulf of Mexico ( 25°50′N 86°30′W  /  25.833°N 86.5°W  / 25.833 -86.5 ) by U-193 (   Kriegsmarine) with the loss of ten of her 80 crew. Survivors were rescued by USS Falgout, USS Raven (both   United States Navy) and Lillemor (   Norway). ⎖]

Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159) - History

The following table shows the officers assigned to submarine-related commands during World War II organized by their Class Year at the US Naval Academy. This table utilizes the sources used in the other
Submarine Commander pages at this site, but especially on research conducted by Tom Woronko. Some information on officers who were killed in action came from On Eternal Patrol . Class years 1938 to 1942
inclusive can be found on this page.

It shows the commands, including those not related to submarines when known, each held during the war (and in some cases just before and just after the war), with dates known to be in command, as well as the
ranks they held, with dates of rank where known. Note that after early 1942 nearly all wartime promotions were temporary in nature - temporary ranks often outstripped permanent ranks by a great deal. Also, date of
rank was primarily for determining seniority and does not necessarily indicate when the officer actually assumed the rank. Postwar, many temporary ranks did become permanent with the same date of seniority.

Please email me if you spot any errors in this table or have any comments.


NavWeaps Forums

Mar 27, 2011 #151 2011-03-27T19:13

Ed wrote: ChrisPat, The 4 hits of the DD ended up sinking her, but that did not stop the attacks in this case,

"Be harmonious, enrich the soldiers, scorn other men"

"Who fights evil beware becoming evil."

“successful, as things go on the winning side, killed more enemy by good, dull tactics than his own by bad, exciting ones.”

Mar 27, 2011 #152 2011-03-27T19:52

That first photo shows Mark 3 antenna's on both main battery directors pretty clearly, IMO. But the action report reproduced in "Operational Experience of Fast Battleships" says under 'Radar':
"FC Radar #1, used by Spot One, failed early in the day and was not back in operation until practically all of the firing had been completed. FC Radar #2 was in and out all day. During the part of the battle where we were engaging enemy light forces neither Main Battery Radar was performing properly"

And, 'FC' in that case almost surely refers to Mark 3, not 'fire control', since Mark 3's alternate designation was 'FC' (Mark 8 was FH, the radars seen on the secondary battery directors in that photo were FD aka Mark 4, FA and FB were versions of the first USN gunnery radar aka CXAS).

This might even also be in the log that was posted I didn't check it in detail. It's a useful primary source, but again without the firing records from the US cruisers and their hit claims and times, and the accounts of hit timing from the French side, no absolute conclusion can be reached about hits anyway.

Mar 27, 2011 #153 2011-03-27T20:45

bgile wrote: I don't think Massachusettes could have had a Mark 8 that day. It was introduced to the fast battleships in Sept of 1942 on USS Indiana. If she had a Mark 3, it can detect a destroyer at 13,500 yards or 18,000 yards with preamplifier (mod 2+).

USS Washington had a Mark 3 at the time of her engagement with Kirishima.

from may to oct "Mamie" had so much being done on it's electronics both in boston and casco and norfolk, not being in the topside crew I know not what it had at CasaBlanca

Mar 27, 2011 #154 2011-03-27T22:31

According to Brad Fischer, the install times for the SoDaks were as follows :

BB57- 2/43 & 8/43
BB58- 9/42 & 10/43
BB59- 1/43 & 8/43
BB60- 11/42 & 8/43

Mar 27, 2011 #155 2011-03-27T23:30

JBren1, I agree. But it really does not matter if MASSACHUSETTS had the Mk. 3 or Mk. 8 FCR, if it wasn't working at the time of the battle, it was just so much dead weight.

The range to the attacking 2nd Light Squadron had to be computed by optics or by the one airplane Mamie had left flying at about 1030-1105. I don't know if MASSACHUSETTS knew at 1030 she had one of her two spotter aircraft shot down, or not. But BB59 was not the only ship who had her spotter's planes up that morning, Wichita and Tuscaloosa had their up, too.

Since the range is firm in the log, it most likely came from the optics on the Spotter's Platform. It was probibly confirmed by aircraft. Now remember all of this is after BB MASSACHUSETTS engaged BB JEAN BART at a range of 24,000 yards and increasing to 29,000 yards. Also remember JB was able to straddle Big Mamie several times, and she had no FCS at all. Her spotting might have been done from El Hank. They were using optics.

Massachusetts used both optics and aircraft to spot for her while shelling Jean Bart, and the ships in the harbor.

One of the confusing things about Casablanca is the US was using one time zone, and the Vichy French were using a time zone that was 30 minutes later.

Wikipedia has a good peice on the Naval Battle of Cassablanca, but uses confusing times, too.

"17.^ a b c d e f g Morocco observed Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) time but, at 7° 35′ West, Casablanca was 30 minutes behind the prime meridian. Astronomical sunrise was 06:54 GMT on the day of the invasion. TF 34's clocks were apparently set to UTC-1. The commencement of USS Massachusetts' shelling of Casablanca harbor is reported as 08:04 by Auphan & Mordal, but 07:04 by USN sources Karig and Potter & Nimitz."

"While the covering force engaged El Hank Battery west of Casablanca, seven ships of the French 2nd Light Squadron sortied from Casablanca harbor at 09:00[22] under cover of a smoke screen to attack the troopships anchored off Fedala to the east.[21] French flotilla leader Milan sortied with destroyers Fougueux and Boulonnais. At 09:20, the French squadron was strafed by fighter planes from Ranger.[22] French gunners sank a landing craft and scored hits on Ludlow.[24] Milan beached after being damaged by gunfire from Wilkes,[25][26] Wichita, and Tuscaloosa.[20] Massachusetts and Tuscaloosa engaged the French destroyers Fougueux at 10:00 and Boulonnais at 10:12.[26] Fougueux sank at 10:40.[24] The French light cruiser Primauguet sortied with flotilla leader destroyer Albatros and destroyers Brestois and Frondeur. Engaged by Massachusetts, the Primauguet force was outgunned as Primauguet had been under refit and was not fully operational, but returned fire nonetheless. The French flotilla was also engaged by Augusta and Brooklyn from 11:00 to 11:20.[26] Albatros beached to avoid sinking. The remaining ships returned to Casablanca harbor where Primauguet beached and burnt out and the two destroyers capsized. Forty-five crew members were killed aboard Primauguet, and more than 200 more wounded. The French submarine Amazone missed Brooklyn with a salvo of torpedoes.[20][25] La Sybille disappeared on a patrol station between Casablanca and Fedala, but the cause of her destruction remains uncertain.[20][27] Surviving French submarines Sidi Ferruch and Le Conquerant sortied without torpedoes to avoid destruction in the harbor. Le Tonnant managed to load a few torpedoes before leaving.

Augusta sank Boulonnais[20] at noon[24] and the only French destroyer remaining operational was L'Alcyon.[21][24] Three small French warships emerged from Casablanca harbor in the early afternoon to rescue sailors from the sunken destroyer Fougueux, but the rescue ships were turned back by shellfire from the American covering force.[28]"

18.^ Potter&Nimitz(1960)pp.572-575
19.^ a b Karig(1946)p.203
20.^ a b c d e f g h i Cressman(2000)p.129
21.^ a b c d e Potter&Nimitz(1960)p.575
22.^ a b c d e f Auphan&Mordal(1960)p.230
23.^ Karig(1946)p.206
24.^ a b c d Auphan&Mordal(1976)p.233
25.^ a b c d e Rohwer&Hummelchen(1992)p.175
26.^ a b c Brown(1995)p.72
27.^ a b Auphan&Mordal(1976)p.235
28.^ Potter and Nimitz refer to a destroyer and two sloops, and Auphan and Mordal identify the destroyer as L'Alcyon. Cressman identifies the three ships as the 1969-ton colonial sloop La Grandiere with second class sloops La Gracieuse and Commandant Delage. La Grandiere was about the size of a destroyer with three 5.5 in (140 mm) guns and a maximum speed of 15 knots. Jane's Fighting Ships refers to the second class sloops as 20-knot, 630-ton minesweepers armed with two 3.5 in (89 mm) guns.

So the DD Massachusetts hit at 1035 (USN time) and sank at 1040 (USN time) was the Fougueux. The French show the engagement began at 1000 (French Time) and 1012 (French Time).

Another confusing event during the Naval Battle is what happened to the French DD La Sybille. She was lost sometime during the Naval Battle, but no USN warship claimed credit for sinking her. She could have been a subject of Friendly Fire from a shore battery or French SS.

Mar 28, 2011 #156 2011-03-28T02:07

Ed wrote: JBren1, I agree. But it really does not matter if MASSACHUSETTS had the Mk. 3 or Mk. 8 FCR, if it wasn't working at the time of the battle, it was just so much dead weight.

The range to the attacking 2nd Light Squadron had to be computed by optics or by the one airplane Mamie had left flying at about 1030-1105. I don't know if MASSACHUSETTS knew at 1030 she had one of her two spotter aircraft shot down, or not. But BB59 was not the only ship who had her spotter's planes up that morning, Wichita and Tuscaloosa had their up, too.

Since the range is firm in the log, it most likely came from the optics on the Spotter's Platform. It was probibly confirmed by aircraft. Now remember all of this is after BB MASSACHUSETTS engaged BB JEAN BART at a range of 24,000 yards and increasing to 29,000 yards. Also remember JB was able to straddle Big Mamie several times, and she had no FCS at all. Her spotting might have been done from El Hank. They were using optics.

Massachusetts used both optics and aircraft to spot for her while shelling Jean Bart, and the ships in the harbor.

One of the confusing things about Casablanca is the US was using one time zone, and the Vichy French were using a time zone that was 30 minutes later.

Wikipedia has a good peice on the Naval Battle of Cassablanca, but uses confusing times, too.

"17.^ a b c d e f g Morocco observed Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) time but, at 7° 35′ West, Casablanca was 30 minutes behind the prime meridian. Astronomical sunrise was 06:54 GMT on the day of the invasion. TF 34's clocks were apparently set to UTC-1. The commencement of USS Massachusetts' shelling of Casablanca harbor is reported as 08:04 by Auphan & Mordal, but 07:04 by USN sources Karig and Potter & Nimitz."

"While the covering force engaged El Hank Battery west of Casablanca, seven ships of the French 2nd Light Squadron sortied from Casablanca harbor at 09:00[22] under cover of a smoke screen to attack the troopships anchored off Fedala to the east.[21] French flotilla leader Milan sortied with destroyers Fougueux and Boulonnais. At 09:20, the French squadron was strafed by fighter planes from Ranger.[22] French gunners sank a landing craft and scored hits on Ludlow.[24] Milan beached after being damaged by gunfire from Wilkes,[25][26] Wichita, and Tuscaloosa.[20] Massachusetts and Tuscaloosa engaged the French destroyers Fougueux at 10:00 and Boulonnais at 10:12.[26] Fougueux sank at 10:40.[24] The French light cruiser Primauguet sortied with flotilla leader destroyer Albatros and destroyers Brestois and Frondeur. Engaged by Massachusetts, the Primauguet force was outgunned as Primauguet had been under refit and was not fully operational, but returned fire nonetheless. The French flotilla was also engaged by Augusta and Brooklyn from 11:00 to 11:20.[26] Albatros beached to avoid sinking. The remaining ships returned to Casablanca harbor where Primauguet beached and burnt out and the two destroyers capsized. Forty-five crew members were killed aboard Primauguet, and more than 200 more wounded. The French submarine Amazone missed Brooklyn with a salvo of torpedoes.[20][25] La Sybille disappeared on a patrol station between Casablanca and Fedala, but the cause of her destruction remains uncertain.[20][27] Surviving French submarines Sidi Ferruch and Le Conquerant sortied without torpedoes to avoid destruction in the harbor. Le Tonnant managed to load a few torpedoes before leaving.

Augusta sank Boulonnais[20] at noon[24] and the only French destroyer remaining operational was L'Alcyon.[21][24] Three small French warships emerged from Casablanca harbor in the early afternoon to rescue sailors from the sunken destroyer Fougueux, but the rescue ships were turned back by shellfire from the American covering force.[28]"

18.^ Potter&Nimitz(1960)pp.572-575
19.^ a b Karig(1946)p.203
20.^ a b c d e f g h i Cressman(2000)p.129
21.^ a b c d e Potter&Nimitz(1960)p.575
22.^ a b c d e f Auphan&Mordal(1960)p.230
23.^ Karig(1946)p.206
24.^ a b c d Auphan&Mordal(1976)p.233
25.^ a b c d e Rohwer&Hummelchen(1992)p.175
26.^ a b c Brown(1995)p.72
27.^ a b Auphan&Mordal(1976)p.235
28.^ Potter and Nimitz refer to a destroyer and two sloops, and Auphan and Mordal identify the destroyer as L'Alcyon. Cressman identifies the three ships as the 1969-ton colonial sloop La Grandiere with second class sloops La Gracieuse and Commandant Delage. La Grandiere was about the size of a destroyer with three 5.5 in (140 mm) guns and a maximum speed of 15 knots. Jane's Fighting Ships refers to the second class sloops as 20-knot, 630-ton minesweepers armed with two 3.5 in (89 mm) guns.

So the DD Massachusetts hit at 1035 (USN time) and sank at 1040 (USN time) was the Fougueux. The French show the engagement began at 1000 (French Time) and 1012 (French Time).

Another confusing event during the Naval Battle is what happened to the French DD La Sybille. She was lost sometime during the Naval Battle, but no USN warship claimed credit for sinking her. She could have been a subject of Friendly Fire from a shore battery or French SS.

Since the range is firm in the log, it most likely came from the optics on the Spotter's Platform. It was probibly confirmed by aircraft. Now remember all of this is after BB MASSACHUSETTS engaged BB JEAN BART at a range of 24,000 yards and increasing to 29,000 yards. Also remember JB was able to straddle Big Mamie several times, and she had no FCS at all. Her spotting might have been done from El Hank. They were using optics.


Lincoln Journal Star

Actual Date Unknown


FTG Frank A Wood - aka "Woody"


FTG Frank A Wood - aka "Woody"


Mullinnix in Action

For Military Region II the month of June brought a forth flurries of enemy activities and this greater utilization of naval gunfire assets. On 1 June LZ Crystal found itself beseiged by NVA forces and receiving rocket, mortar, and artillery fire. The ARVN commander requested two US Navy destroyers with 5"/54 caliber guns be made available for continuous long range coverage. From 4-14 June the gunline commander provided two such destroyers which fired in support of friendly troops.


Note: These 40 Rounds Are Counted Towards 31 May's Total (See Above)


Additional 340 Rounds Fired by Mullinnix on 1 June


Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159) - History

45,000 Tons (Light)
57,599 Tons (Full Load)
887'3" x 108'3" x 38'
Armament (as built)
9 x 16" 50 cal Mark 7 guns
20 x 5" 38 cal Mark 12 guns
80 x 40mm AA guns
49 x20mm AA guns

Departed Brooklyn for sea trials off New York and a shakedown cruise in Chesapeake Bay. On November 11, 1944 departed for Norfolk bound for the Pacific Fleet. On November 18, 1944 transited the Panama Canal then proceeded to San Francisco for final fitting out. Initially, Missouri was painted with dazzle camouflage Camouflage Measure 32, Design 22D but was later repainted gray.

Wartime History
On December 14, 1944 departed San Francisco and ten days later arrived at Pearl Harbor then departed January 2, 1945 across the Pacific Ocean and arrived eleven days later at Ulithi and became the temporary headquarters for Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher.

On January 27, 1945 departed Ulithi as part of the screening force for the Task Force 58 (TF-58) including USS Lexington CV-16. On February 1, 1945 anchored at berth #36 at Ulithi loading provisions and carrying out routine work. On February 2, 1945 moved to firing berth Able and conducted anti-aircraft firing aimed at towed target sleeves. On February 10, 1945 at 7:20am got underway for gunnery practice and launched three SC-1 Seahawk floatplanes observation of main and secondary battery surface firing. Shortly after take off, SC-1 Seahawk 35362 piloted by Lt. Everett N. Frothingham developed engine trouble and crashed into the sea and the pilot died before USS Lewis Hancock DD-675 could be rescued. On February 16, 1945 carrier aircraft attacked Japan. Afterwards, Missouri provides gunfire support against targets on Iwo Jima in support of the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) landing then departed with to Task Force 58 (TF-58).

On March 5, 1945 arrived at Ulithi and was assigned to the carrier task group with USS Yorktown and departed nine days later to support carrier aircraft attacks against Japan. On March 18, 1945 took up station off the Inland Sea and as part of the screening force claimed four planes shot down afterwards provided cover for the withdrawal of damaged USS Franklin then proceeded to Okinawa. On March 24, 1945 Missouri was part of the pre-Invasion bombardment of Okinawa until the amphibious landings commenced on April 1, 1945 then joined the screening force for the operation.

On April 11, 1945 off Okinawa sixteen enemy aircraft were spotted on radar. One plane, an A6M Zero likely piloted by Ishino Setsuo approached from the stern and although hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into the starboard side of the battleship. A famous photo was taken just moments before the aircraft impacted.

The plane ricocheted away, causing only minor damage, but the pilot was catapulted from the cockpit, and his body demolished part of a gun mount. The pilot's body landed on the deck and was buried by the ship the next day, with a Marine honor guard firing a salute. A dent in the hull between frames 159 and 165 still remains. Inside a display case are pieces of wreckage from this Zero, believed to be piloted by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ishino Setsuo.

On April 17, 1945 detected an enemy submarine 12 miles away and carrier aircraft from USS Bataan and four destroyers were dispatched that resulted in the sinking of Japanese submarine I-56. On May 5, 1945 detached and returned to Ulithi.

On August 29, 1945 U.S. Navy (USN) warships with minesweepers enter Tokyo Bay with USS Iowa (BB-61) anchors off Yokosuka. On September 1, 1945 anchored at berth F 71 in Tokyo Bay and spent the day preparing for the official surrender ceremony scheduled for the next morning.

Surrender of Japan
On September 2, 1945 at 7:00am the American press corps of 170 newsmen and cameramen on USS Buchanan (DD-484) board Missouri to prepare for coverage of the official surrender ceremony. Next, senior military officers from every Allied nation arrive aboard launches and destroyers. At 8:43am General Douglas MacArthur and Fleet Admiral Nimitz board Missouri. Displayed nearby was a framed U.S. flag flown by Commodore Matthew C. Perry's flagship USS Susquehanna when it entered Edo Bay (Tokyo Bay) on July 8, 1853.

At 8:56am the Japanese representatives boarded led by Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu. At 9:02am General Douglas MacArthur stepped to the microphones and began the twenty-three minute ceremony. The Japanese emissaries signed the instrument of surrender officially ending the Pacific War and World War II. Closing the ceremony, General Douglas MacArthur states: "Let us pray that peace be now restored to the world and that God will preserve it always. These proceedings are closed!" At 9:30am the Japanese representatives departed followed by MacArthur and Nimitz then the senior officers.

On October 27, 1945 participates in Navy Day Fleet Review in New York Harbor and fires a salute with one of her 5" guns. During the ceremonies, USS Renshaw (DD-499) delivers U.S. President Harry S. Truman aboard with Admiral Jonas H. Ingram, Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, Chief of Staff, and Brigadier General Vaughn to inspect the battleship and the surrender location.

Postwar
Decommissioned in 1955 and returned to service. Again decommissioned in 1991. In 1996 she was towed to Pearl Harbor for permanent display moored off Ford Island.

USS Missouri as Museum
Open to visitors with paid admission from the USS Missouri Memorial Museum. The ship forms the bookend of WWII Naval history, permanently moored at Battleship Row, to the side of the USS Arizona Memorial. Although the battleship was modernized during the 1980's the flying bridge controls are the same as those used in WWII.

Memorials
A brass historical marker is located on the deck at the site of the official surrender of Japan on September 2, 1945. Today, the plaque is covered with a porthole cover to protect the plaque.

References
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - July 24-31, 1944
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - September 1944
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - October 1944
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - November 1944
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - December 1944
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - January 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - February 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - March 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - April 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - May 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - June 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - July 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - August 1945
NARA USS Missouri War Diary - September 1945
Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) Tokyo Bay: The Formal Surrender of the Empire of Japan, USS Missouri, 2 September 1945
NavSource - USS Missouri BB-63 (photos)
AP Images - WWII Japan Surrender 686883055949
Battleship Missouri Memorial official website

Contribute Information
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Awards

USS Ponaganset (AO-86), at the General Ship and Iron Works, Boston, MA., 9 December 1947 "Christmas at Sea" program used on the USS Ponaganset, December 25, 1945 (outside) "Christmas at Sea" program used on the USS Ponaganset, December 25, 1945 (inside)

Ponaganset decommissioned on 26 April 1946 and was struck from the Navy List on 23 April 1947. She was returned to the Maritime Commission for disposal at Norfolk on 15 May 1947.

Ponaganset earned two battle stars for World War II service.


Awnings on USS Schenck (DD-159) - History

The Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) is the fourth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier. The contract was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Company on September 30, 1980. The keel was laid down on October 31, 1981, with Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger initiating the first weld. On November 3, Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman announced that the carrier would be named for the 26th President of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt.

She was the first aircraft carrier to be assembled in large sections, or modules. The process started with the ship in pieces, much like a plastic model. The pieces were pre-staged in "lay-down" areas, assembled into large modules, hoisted into place, and welded together. Many of the larger systems were installed in the modules while they were still in the lay-down areas. This reduced the need for cutting and rewelding access passages. Modular construction, made possible through the use of a huge gantry crane capable of lifting 900 tons, cut 16 months off TR's construction time. The innovative construction techniques employed in Theodore Roosevelt have been used on every aircraft carrier since.

October 27, 1984 The Pre-Commissioning Unit Theodore Roosevelt was officially christened. Mrs. Barbara Lehman, the wife of SECNAV John F. Lehman, served as sponsor of the ship. Capt. Paul W. Parcells is the prospective commanding officer.

October 25, 1986 USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) was commissioned during a ceremony at Outfitting Berth #1, Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va.

November 3, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier departed Newport News for flight deck certification off the coast of Virginia. At 1300, an C-1A from VRC-40 become the first aircraft to make an arrested landing on the Theodore Roosevelt.

November 4, An A-7E Corsair II from Navy Air Test Center (NATC) Patuxent River, Maryland, was the first fixed wing aircraft launched from the deck of TR.

November 17, USS Theodore Roosevelt arrived at its homeport of Naval Station Norfolk in Norfolk, Virginia, for the first time.

From Dec. 7-19, the Roosevelt was underway in the Jacksonville Op. Area for Weapons System Ship Qualification Trials (WSSQT).

December 23, Vice Adm. Richard M. Dunleavy relieved Vice Adm. Robert F. Dunn as Commander, Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 71 at Naval Station Norfolk's Pier 12.

Janaury 4, 1987 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a six-week Shakedown Cruise in the Guantanamo Bay OPAREA.

January 12, An SH-3H, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11, ditched in sea off the coast of Florida after experiencing mechanical difficulties. Crew members rescued safely.

January 28, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off the coast of New Providence island in The Bahamas for a five-day visit to Nassau.

From March 2-12, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier was underway in the Jacksonville Op. Area for a Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment.

March 14, CVN 71 departed homeport for it's first Dependent's Day Cruise with 8,000 friends and family members.

March 30, USS Theodore Roosevelt entered the Newport News Shipbuilding for a four-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA).

After conduting sea trials from July 27-29, the TR was underway for Shock Trials Practice from Aug. 4-14 Underway for shock trials from Aug. 31- Sept. 4 and Sept. 8-21.

September 9, An SH-60F, piloted by Lt. Jeff Miller, from NATC Patuxent River made its first landing on a carrier at sea.

October 3, Capt. Dayton W. Ritt relieved Capt. Paul W. Parcells as CO of the Roosevelt.

From October 6-15, the Theodore Roosevelt was underway in the Jacksonville Op. Area for Fleet Carrier Qualifications Underway again for FCQ in the Virgina Capes Op. Area from February 23 through March 3, 1988.

March 13, Airman E3 Ronald E. Krauss, assigned to Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 124, was killed by C-2 propeller during flight operations.

April 7, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Naval Station Norfolk after two-day Tiger Cruise from Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. The ship was underway for four weeks, conducting CQ and Shakedown operations in the Jacksonville and Guantanamo Bay OPAREAs Underway again for FCQ in the Virgina Capes Op. Area from April 18-24.

From May 23 through June 28, the TR was underway for Advance Phase Training in the Virginia Capes, Jacksonville and Caribbean Operating Areas. On May 30, the Airman Apprentice William H. Berry, III was lost at sea after blown overboard by an A-6 Intruder during flight operations, 163 miles northeast of Jacksonville, Fla. Port visit to St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, from June 17-19.

July 6, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for Independent Steaming Exercises (ISE) in Virginia Capes Op. Area Underway for Fleet CQ from July 20-24 and Aug. 15-18.

August 25, The Roosevelt departed homeport, for the first time with its Battle Group, to participate in NATO Exercise Teamwork '88, in northern Atlantic Ocean Entered the Festfjord, Norway, on Sept. 14.

September 25, CVN 71 arrived in Wilhelmshaven, Federal Republic of Germany, for a four-day port call Returned home on Oct. 11.

From Nov. 7-18, the aircraft carrier was underway in the Puerto Rican Op. Area for Fleet Exercise (FLEETEX) 1-89.

December 30, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for its maiden Mediterranean deployment. It is also the maiden deployment of the first 10-squadron Air Wing, CVW-8.

January 15, 1989 USS Theodore Roosevelt Battle group relieved USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) BG as Commander, Task Force (TF) 60, in the Mediterranean Sea.

January 24, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a week-long port call.

February 10, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off Marseille, France, for a six-day port visit. Unexpected Mistral winds forced emergency sortie on 14th. Returned on 16th to pick up the crewmembers and departed on Feb. 17.

February 24, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Alexandria, Egypt, for a three-day port call Port visit to Antalya, Turkey, from March 3-10.

March 15, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored off Naples, Italy, for a five-day port visit Anchored in Tangier Harbour on March 25, for a two-day visit to Morocco Anchored in Augusta Bay, Sicily, from March 29-31 Anchored off Toulon, France, from April 3-10. Anchored off Monaco, France, from April 14-17. During the transit to Monaco, on April 13, aircraft from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 9 rescued fifteen British yachtsmen from four sailboats foudering in hurricane-like seas.

April 25, CVN 71 pulled again in Augusta Bay for a brief port call. The TR is currently participating in NATO exercise Dragon Hammer, April 20- May 2.

May 4, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored off the coast of Haifa, Israel, for a five-day port call. Anchored again on May 12, for a four-day visit before participating in exercise Juniper Stallion, May 18-20. Port visit to Palma de Mallorca from May 24 through June 3.

June 8, The TR pulled into Augusta Bay, Italy, for a two-day port call after participating in exercise Sardinia '89, from June 4-7, with units from Italy, France and Spain.

June 15, The Theodore Roosevelt conducted turnover with USS Coral Sea (CV 43) Participated in National Week 89B exercise from June 10-18.

June 30, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to homeport after a six-month deployment.

July 31, The fourth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a three-and-a-half month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

November 24, CVN 71 departed NNSY for a two-day sea trials Underway for Fleet Carrier Qualifications in VACAPES Op. Area, from December 6-13.

January 24, 1990 USS Theodore Roosevelt underway again for Fleet Carrier Qualifications in the Vrginia Capes Op. Area FCQ also from Feb. 22-28, March 9-16 and April 24-30.

May 4, Vice Adm. Michael P. Kalleres relieved Vice Adm. Jerome L. Johnson as Commander, U.S. Second Fleet, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the TR.

May 9, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a Refresher Training (REFTRA) Port visit to Port Everglades, Fla., from May 18-22.

June 9, Capt. Charles S. Abbot relieved Capt. Dayton W. Ritt as CO of the Roosevelt during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Naval Station Norfolk.

June 16, The Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a Dependent's Day Cruise.

From June 20 through July 27, the aircraft carrier was underway in the Puerto Rican OPAREA for Advanced Phase Training (APT). Port visits to St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, from July 2-6 and Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago.

September 25, CVN 71 departed Norfolk for a week-long underway to conduct Fleet Carrier Qualifications.

October 12, USS Theodore Roosevelt pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a three-day visit to Ft. Lauderdale to participate in Broward County Navy Days celebration Returned home on Oct. 19 after FCQ Underway for FLEETEX 1-91, from Oct. 31 through Nov. 19.

December 28, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in support of Operations Desert Shield.

December 31, An EA-6B, assigned to Tactical Electronics Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 141, went into water after an arresting gear cable parted when the aircraft was attempting to land. Crewmembers rescued.

January 14, 1991 The Theodore Roosevelt entered the Red Sea after transiting Suez Canal.

January 19, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Desert Storm, from station in the Arabian Gulf.

January 24, An F/A-18C, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 15, was lost at sea due to engine failure/loss of control. Lt. H. E. Overs ejected safely.

February 2, An A-6, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 36, was lost on a combat mission over Faylaka Island. Lt. Cmdr. Barry T. Cook and Lt. Patrick Kelly were killed.

February 5, An F/A-18C, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87, crashed in North Arabian Gulf after returning from a combat mission. Lt. Robert J. Dwyer was lost at sea.

In the night of Feb. 20, John Bridget, a Greenshirt, worked on the flight deck and helped to prepare the jets for takeoff. He was at the catapult where an A-6 Intruder stood ready for takeoff and he was too tired to notice that he was too close to the plane and suddenly he was sucked into the plane's turbine. The other people noticed the accident only when a jet of flame ran out of the plane's tail. The takeoff was then broken off but nobody really knew what to do. One moment later John Bridget crawl out of the turbine and collapsed on the flight deck. His only injuries were some scratches. He survived because of his protective suit which destroyed and stopped the turbine.

March 12, USS Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day R&R after 75 days at sea Anchored off Bahrain Bell on March 21.

On April 1, the Theodore Roosevelt transited the Strait of Bab El Mandeb and began a three-week operation in the Red Sea.

April 21, CVN 71 arrived on station northeast of Cyprus and commenced photo reconnaissance and tactical air cover missions over northern Iraq in support of Operation Provide Comfort, after Iraqi forces turned on the Kurds.

May 25, The TR anchored off Haifa, Israel, for a five-day port visit. Anchored off Rhodes, Greece, from June 2-7 Turnover with USS Forrestal (CV 59) on June 14.

June 28, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Norfolk after a three-day Tiger Cruise from Bermuda, completing the six-month combat deployment. Aircraft from CVW-8 flew 3,897 sorties and dropped 4,843,233 pounds of ordnance in support of ODS, before the cease-fire on Feb. 28.

August 6, Vice Adm. Antony A. Less relieved Vice Adm. J. K. Ready as Commander, Naval Air Force U.S. Atlantic Fleet, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Roosevelt.

August 12, Capt. Charles W. Moore, Jr., relieved Capt. William J. Fallon as commanding officer of CVW-8 during a ceremony aboard the CVN 71.

August 19, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a six-day Fleet Carrier Qualifications in the Virginia Capes OPAREA.

September 13, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off the coast of Halifax, Nova Scotia, for a three-day port visit Returned to Norfolk on Sept. 20.

September 21, The fourth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Dependent's Day Crise.

October 1, USS Theodore Roosevelt entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) for a six-month Drydock Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA).

After sea trials from May 15-17, 1992, the TR was underway from May 20-27 for FRS/CVW-8 CQ off the coast of Virginia Underway for CSSQT from June 8-25 Port visit to St. Thomas from June 18-22 Underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area from July 17-21.

July 25, The Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a Dependent's Day Cruise.

From August 6-22, the TR was underway for Refresher Training (REFTRA) and ORSE in the VACAPES Area of Operation.

August 27, Capt. Stanley W. Bryant relieved Capt. Charles S. Abbot as CO of CVN 71.

October 6, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for FRS/CVW-8 CQ Port visit to Ft. Lauderdale from Oct. 13-19 for Broward County Navy Days.

November 12, The Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) 2-93.

November 26, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Charlotte Amalie, U.S. Virgin Islands, for a three-day visit to St. Thomas Returned home on Dec. 8.

From Dec. 14-18, the Roosevelt was underway for initial phase of integration of Special Purpose Marine Air Ground Task Force (SPMAGTF).

January 14, 1993 USS Theodore Roosevelt underway for a two-week integraion of SPMAGTF into the CVN 71/CVW-8 team Underway for the secondary phase of integration from Feb. 2-11, to test the concept of embarking a multi-purpose Marine force in a carrier.

March 11, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for its third deployment.

March 25, The Theodore Roosevelt Battle Group relieved USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) BG and commenced its support for Operation Provide Promise in the Adriatic Sea.

March 26, An E-2C, assigned to Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 124, crashed into Ionian Sea, about a mile from the carrier, shortly after "waved off" from a landing attempt on the TR, due to a "foul deck". All five crewmembers were lost at sea.

April 12, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 launched its first sorties in support of Operation Deny Flight.

May 28, USS Theodore Rosevelt anchored of the coast of Rhodes, Greece, for a five-day port visit after 78 days at sea.

On June 26, the TR departed Adriatic Sea en route to Marseille, France Received orders to enter Red Sea in support of Operation Southern Watch on June 27 Commenced flight operations on July 1.

On July 12, a loadmaster for C-2E was blown overboard and lost at sea Returned to Mediterranean on July 15.

July 18, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off Naples, Italy, for an eight-day port call Returned to Adratic Sea in late July Port visit to Corfu, Greece, from Aug. 6-11 Turnover with US America (CV 66) on Aug. 26.

September 8, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned home after deployed for 184 days 169 days underway.

Underway from Oct. 18-21, off the coast of Virginia, to conduct ammo off-load with USS Nitro (AE 23) and CVW-8 Carrier Qualifications.

October 23, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed Norfolk for a Dependent's Day Cruise.

November 19, CVN 71 arrived at Pier 5 in Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

April 14, 1994 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed NNSY for a week-long sea trials.

From May 17-27, the TR was underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) IV and ammunition onload Underway for TSTA I from June 21-29.

July 8, Capt. Ronald L. Christenson relieved Capt. Stanley W. Bryant as commanding officer of the Theodore Roosevelt Underway for TSTA II from July 19-28.

August 17, The Theodore Roosevelt returned to homeport after an 18-day underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) and Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE).

From Nov. 2 through Dec. 15, CVN 71 was underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) III and COMPTUEX Port visit to St. Maarten, Netherlands Antilles, from Nov. 22-25.

January 21, 1995 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a two-week Joint Forces Exercise (JTFEX) 95-2.

March 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment.

April 5, The TR BG conducted turnover with USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Battle Group Port visit to Haifa, Israel, from April 10-13.

From April 14-26, the Roosevelt operated in the Red Sea in support of Operation Southern Watch.

May 2, USS Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a six-day visit to Dubai Returned to Mediterranean Sea on May 20.

From May 26 through June 4, the aircraft carrier conducted flight operations in support of Operations Deny Flight and Sharp Guard over the skies of Bosnia, while on station in the Adriatic Sea.

June 5, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Corfu, Greece, for a four-day visit Port call to Rhodes, Greece, from July 2-7 and Trieste, Italy, from July 24-29.

August 16, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored again off Haifa, Israel, for a six-day port visit before participating in exercise Infinite Moonlight.

On August 30, the Operation Deny Flight evolved into Operation Deliberete Force, as aircraft from CVW-8 led NATO strikes against strategic Bosnian Serb targets Turnover with USS America in Adriatic Sea from Sep. 9-12.

September 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

October 28, CVN 71 departed homeport for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

November 9, The Theodore Roosevelt entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

March 19, 1996 The fourth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed Portsmouth, Va., for a six-day sea trials.

April 12, Capt. Matthew G. Moffit relieved Capt. Thomas E. Zelibor as CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 during a ceremony aboard the TR.

April 15, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for a 17-day Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II.

May 31, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off the coast of Halifax, Canada, for a four-day port visit Underway again for TSTA IV on July 9.

July 31, CVN 71 departed Norfolk for a seven-week underway period to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) III/FEP and COMPTUEX.

August 9, An F/A-18C, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105, crashed at sea. Lt. Craig M. Munsen was killed.

August 18, The TR anchored off the coast of St. Maarten, Netherlands Antiles, for a three-day visit Port visit to Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., on Sept. 7.

October 9, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a 16-day Joint Training Fleet Exercise (JTFEX).

October 14, USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55) crashed into USS Theodore Roosevelt off the coast of North Carolina. The collision ripped open the front of the Leyte Gulf and caused $9 million in damage to the rear of TR.

November 1, Capt. David Architzel relieved Rear Adm. Ronald L. Christenson as CO of the CVN 71.

November 25, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for its fifth deployment in support of Operation Southern Watch.

December 8, USS Theodore Roosevelt Battle Group conducted turnover with USS Enterprise BG.

December 12, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Cartagena, Spain, for a four-day port call Anchored off Canes, France, from Dec. 24-26.

December 31, The Roosevelt anchored off Naples, Italy, for a scheduled port visit to celebrate the New Year.

February 4, 1997 An S-3B Viking, assigned to Sea Control Squadron (VS) 22, crashed approx. 87 miles west of Haifa, Israel, around 6 p.m. local time, while on a routine training exercise, 47 miles from the Theodore Roosevelt. Lt. Cmdr. Mark A. Ehlers, Lt. Mark J. Eyre, Lt. Mike Weems and AW3 Wendy L. Potter were lost at sea.

May 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment.

On July 8, CVN 71 entered the Newport News Shipbuilding yard for a one-year Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (EDSRA), its first major overhaul since commissioning.

September 22, 1998 Capt. David R. Bryant relieved Capt. David Architzel as the 7th CO of the Roosevelt.

March 26, 1999 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a surge deployment.

April 6, The Battle Group arrived on station in the Ionian Sea to support NATO's Operation Noble Anvil.

May 7, The Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Antalya, Turkey, for a five-day port visit.

During Operation Noble Anvil(Allied Force), Between April 6 and June 9, aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 flew 4,270 sorties, of which 3,055 were combat and delivered 800 tons of ordnance on targets throughout the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. These sorties involved essential combat support missions, such as close air support, battlefield airborne interdiction, electronic support and airborne battlefield command and control, as well as strike missions.

June 14, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for an eight-day liberty visit Port visit to Cannes, France, from June 29 through July 5.

July 15, The Theodore Roosevelt entered the Arabian Gulf in support Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the "no-fly" zone over Southern Iraq.

July 24, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier anchored at Bahrain Bell Ancorage for a three-day visit to Manama.

September 4, The TR anchored off the coast of Rhodes, Greece, for a six-day port visit. Aircraft from CVW-8 flew more than 1,000 sorties in support of OSW and delivered 55 pieces of ordnance on tragets in Iraq.

September 24, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Norfolk after a six-month combat deployment.

October 30, The Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

January 7, 2000 USS Theodore Roosevelt entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

June 10, 2001 CVN 71 is currently participating in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) in the Puerto Rican OPAREA.

September 19, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for its seventh deployment, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

February 19, 2002 The Theodore Roosevelt broke the record of 152 consecutive days at sea, set by the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) in 1980.

February 27, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored at Bahrain Bell for a liberty port visit to Manama after a record 161 days at sea.

On the morning of March 13, the Egyptian navy reported finding a body of Lt. Joseph Irvin in the water near Port Said Lighthouse, that was reported missing from the Theodore Roosevelt on March 8. Irvin, temporarily assigned to CVN 71, was a crewmember of USS Vella Gulf (CG 72). At the time of the incident, the carrier was transiting the Mediterranean Sea on its way back to Norfolk.

March 27, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to homeport after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

In May, the Theodore Roosevelt entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a five-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

September 25, Rear Adm. John C. Harvey, Jr., relieved Rear Adm. Kevin J. Cosgriff as Commander, Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Battle Group and Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Group 8, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the TR.

November 1, CVN 71 departed Norfolk Naval Shipyard for sea trials Underway for flight deck certification with the CVW-1 from Nov. 9-17 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) in early December.

January 6, 2003 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for TSTA III, Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) and Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

On January 21, after various reports in the media indicated that a deployment had been ordered, the Navy confirmed that the CVN 71 Battle Group was to deploy as soon as the Battle Group had been certified.

January 26, An F-14D, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213, crashed around 4.30. p.m. while trapping on board, while the carrier was underway about 60 miles east of Puerto Rico. Both the pilot and RIO ejected safely and were rescued 15 minutes later.

February 4, USS Theodore Roosevelt BG successfully completed COMPTUEX and have been certified ready to deploy from the Puerto Rican Op. Area today in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and other contingencies if required Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on Feb. 12.

March 2, USS Theodore Roosevelt pulled into Souda Bay, Crete, for a four-day port call.

March 23, Aircraft from Carier Air Wing (CVW) 8 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom in Iraq, around 1.45. a.m. local, from station in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

March 25, The Navy spokesmen announced that aircraft flying missions from Theodore Roosevelt were to begin shifting from carefully planned bombing strikes against priority Iraqi military targets, to more directly supporting allied troops locked in battle with Iraqi forces on the ground.

USS Theodore Roosevelt continued to operate as the "night carrier." In order to adjust to what pilots referred to as their "Vampire" sorties, the Tomcat aircrew of VF-213 coined the phrase "living after midnight, bombing till dawn." These aerial missions into Iraq typically required up to five to six hours of flight time, including at least one or more rendezvous&rsquo with orbiting airborne tankers.

April 6, Enlisted Terminal Attack Controller Technical Sergeant Todd Gannon, USAF, of Operational Detachment Alpha 392, directed a pair of F-14D Tomcats, from VF-213, against a pack of Iraqi tanks firing from the south. One of the Tomcats made a bombing run against the Iraqis, but the jet missed its intended targets and accidentally bombed allies while they re-grouped around a disabled T-55 tank. The bomb exploded in the midst of the Kurds, killing 17 of the warriors and injuring another 45, including Commander Wajih Barzani of the Peshmerga&rsquos special operations forces and brother of Massoud Barzani, the leader of the Kurdish Democratic Party.

April 19, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off the coast Koper, Slovenia, for a five-day port visit.

April 30, A milestone was reached when TR launched its 100,000th aircraft, assigned to the "Shadowhawks" of Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 141.

May 11, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off Cartagena, Spain, for a week-long port visit.

May 19, Capt. David Newland, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F-14D assigned to the "Black Lions" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213.

May 29, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a nearly five-month combat deployment. Aircraft from CVW-8 flew more than 6,500 sorties, including 1,003 combat sorties, and dropped over 1 million pounds of ordnance in support of OIF.

June 25, Capt. Johnny L. Green relieved Capt. Richard J. O'Hanlon as CO of the CVN 71 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

July 24, The Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a two-day Tiger Cruise.

From August 13-21, the aircraft carrier was underway for CVW-8/TRACOM CQ in the Virginia Capes and Jacksonville Op. Areas.

August 23, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a Friends and Family Day Cruise Underway again for Carrier Qualifications and a sustainment operations from Sept. 9-20.

October 3, Adm. William J. Fallon relieved Adm. Robert J. Natter as Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command and Commander, U.S. Atlantic Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Roosevelt at Naval Station Norfolk.

October 31, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for FRS-CQ and ammo off-load with the USNS Mount Baker (T-AE 34) and USS George Washington (CVN 73).

February 19, 2004 USS Theodore Roosevelt entered the Newport News Shipyard for a 10-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA) Undocked and moored at Pier 5 in NNSY on Aug. 11 Underway for sea trials from Dec. 11-15.

January 12, 2005 The Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for a nine-day underway to conduct flight deck certification.

January 15, The "Big Stick" responded to a call to assist three men stranded on their sailboat approximately 200 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C. The men, all from Ottawa, Canada, set sail on Jan. 12 from Moorhead City, N.C., headed for St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands. They were flown back to aircraft carrier and taken to medical for evaluation.

February 18, Adm. John B. Nethman relieved Adm. William J. Fallon as Commander, Fleet Forces Command, in a ceremony held aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt.

March 10, CVN 71 recently completed its Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment and is currently underway for Carrier Qualification (CQ), off the coast of North Carolina Conducted ammunition onload with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) from March 12-13 Underway for a Tailored Ship Training Availability and Final Evaluation Problem (TSTA/FEP) from March 22- April 13.

May 18, The Theodore Roosevelt is currently underway for routine carrier qualifications.

June 9, Capt. J.R. Haley relieved Capt. "Turk" Green as CO of USS Theodore Roosevelt during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

June 23, The "Big Stick" is currently underway for a three-week Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

July 4, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored off Port Everglades, Fla., for a port visit to celebrate the Independence Day Inport Port Everglades from July 5-8.

July 14, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for an eight-day for Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX). More than 15,000 service members from four countries are participating in JTFEX 05-2, Operation Brewing Storm. The Spanish frigate SPS Alvaro de Bazan (F 101) will serve as a TR CSG ship during this exercise and the CSG's subsequent deployment. This marks the first time a European vessel has deployed as part of a U.S. CSG with this level of integration by participating in pre-deployment training and operating as a true strike group unit.

July 26, CVN 71 is currently underway for Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE).

August 1, Lt. Gen. Robert W. Wagner, USAF, relieved Adm. Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr., as Commander, Joint Forces Command, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the TR.

September 1, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism.

September 12, The Theodore Roosevelt CSG entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting Strait of Gibraltar Anchored off Palma de Mallorca, Spain, from Sept. 13-17.

September 17, Two EA-6B Prowlers and 62 sailors of VAQ-141 detached from the carrier to deploy for three weeks to Al Asad, Iraq.

September 19, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a four-day port visit. Transited Suez Canal on Sept. 27.

October 2, USS Theodore Roosevelt transited Bab el-Mandeb southbound and commenced flight operations at the Godoria Range near Djibouti. Launced its first sorties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) on Oct. 6.

October 19, Tomcats, assigned to Fighter Squafron (VF) 31, bombed a known Iraqi facility where insurgents manufactured improvised explosive devices (IEDs), northeast of Baghdad.

October 24, The port nose wheel of an An C-2A Greyhound, assigned to VRC-40 Det. 1, failed in a catastrophic explosion, showering the area with fragments that injured a servicemember from VAW-124. The sailor suffered a compound facture to the left leg and a fracture to the right leg, prompting his evacuation for additional medical treatment in Kuwait.

November 14, Aircraft assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 continued support of Operation Steel Curtain throughout the second week of November, conducting five consecutive days of strikes against terrorist targets in support of coalition troops in Iraq. OSC is an offensive aimed at preventing cells of Al Qaeda from entering Iraq through the Syrian border. Since Nov. 6, CVW 8 has flown nearly 400 sorties in support of Steel Curtain. Coalition ground forces consisting of 1,000 Iraqi Army Soldiers and 2,500 U.S. Marines began the offensive on Nov. 4 near the town of Husaybah near the Iraq/Syria border.

December 18, Helicopter and boat crews from the Theodore Roosevelt rescued an 18-year old female Sailor after she fell overboard, at approximately 2:15 a.m., while the ship was conducting maritime security operations (MSO) in the Arabian Gulf.

December 28, CVN 71 departed Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, after a liberty port visit. Five F/A-18C Hornets and about 50 sailors of VFA-15 and VFA-87 detached recently from the carrier and flew ashore to Al Asad.

January 22, 2006 USS Theodore Roosevelt pulled again into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a liberty port visit to Dubai.

February 8, A chapter in naval aviation history drew to a close aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt with the last recovery of an F-14 Tomcat from a combat mission. Piloted by Capt. William G. Sizemore II, commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Fighter Squadron (VF) 213’s aircraft 204 was trapped at 12:35 a.m. and marked one of the final stages of the Navy’s transition from the F-14 to F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet. Lt. Bill Frank, a VF-31 pilot, also took part in the last mission, and is credited with being the last pilot to ever drop a bomb from an F-14 Tomcat. During their final deployment with TR, VF-31 and 213 collectively completed 1,163 combat sorties totaling 6,876 flight hours, and dropped 9,500 pounds of ordnance during reconnaissance, surveillance, and close air support missions in support of OIF. VF-213 pilots who are making the transition to the Super Hornet will begin F/A-18F training in April, and the squadron will be operational, or "safe for flight," in September. VF-31 pilots who are making the transition will begin F/A-18E training in October, and the squadron will be safe for flight in April 2007. This will make VF-31 the last official Tomcat squadron in the Navy.

February 15, The Theodore Roosevelt and San Jacinto (CG 56) transited the Suez Canal northbound as they continue their return trip home. However, detachments from VAQ-141, VFA-87, and VFA-15, remain in the 5th Fleet AoR in support of OIF and will rejoin the TR later this month. Aircraft from CVW-8 launched more than 5,500 sorties, totaling more than 21,000 flight hours.

February 16, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored off Marmaris, Turkey, for a five-day port visit Inport Souda Bay, Crete, from Feb. 22-2? Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on March 3.

March 10, An F-14D "Tomcat" number 201 assigned to VF-213 "Black Lions", piloted by Lt. Ken Hockycko and Lt. Roy Emanuel, last departed CVN 71, marking the final launch of an F-14 fighter during an operational deployment.

March 11, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism. Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 flew exactly 10,000 sorties and logged nearly 30,750 mishap-free flight hours. Of these, 3,300 flight hours were flown over Iraq delivering 52 bombs and air-to-ground missiles in support of coalition troops on the ground in the vicinity of Al Hillah, Al Mansuriyah, Baquba, Basrah, Kirkuk, Madain, Mosul, and Tall Afar.

April 22, CVN 71 is currently underway of the East Coast maintaining qualifications as part of the Fleet Response Plan (FRP).

May 10, The Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for Carrier Qualifications (CQ).

June 7, Rear Adm. Michael Vitale assumed the position of Commander, Carrier Strike Group Two, during a change of command ceremony held aboard the Theodore Roosevelt. The ship is currently underway maintaining qualifications as part of the FRP.

July 21, More than 16,000 service members from five countries will participate in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 06-2 "Operation Bold Step," from July 21-31. JTFEX 06-2 serves as the forward-certifying event for the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group, and sustainment training for units from USS Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group and USS Bataan Expeditionary Strike Group.

July 28, An F-14D "Tomcat" number 112, assigned to VF-31 "Tomccaters" and piloted by Lt. Blake Coleman and Radar Intercept Officer Lt. Cmdr. Dave Lauderbaugh, was launched from catapult No. 3 at 4:42 p.m., from the "Big Stick", marking the final launch of an F-14 Tomcat fighter aircraft. The last launch marks the end of an era for Naval Aviation. The F-14 will officially retire in September 2006, after 32 years of service to the fleet.

August 12, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise Underway for CQ on Aug. 22 or earlier Underway again from Sept. 20-2? and in mid-October.

October 25, A ceremony honoring the 20th anniversary of the commissioning of the Theodore Roosevelt took place in the ship's hangar bay at Naval Station Norfolk.

November 27, CVN 71 recently departed homeport for carrier qualifications in the Virginia Capes Op. Area Underway again in mid-December.

January 17, 2007 USS Theodore Roosevelt is currently underway for routine training as part of the fleet response plan Underway for ammo offload with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) from Feb. 6-10.

March 7, USS Theodore Roosevelt entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). The Navy's fourth Nimitz-class aircraft carrier will undergo more than 90 major modifications, including a JP-5 (fuel system) alteration and installation of a new electronic throttle system in the ship's propulsion plants. The ship also will receive a rolling airframe missile modification for the Close-In Weapons System, and a local area network (LAN) system upgrade.

November 28, The Theodore Roosevelt returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a nearly nine-month DPIA.

December 10, The "Big Stick" is currently underway off the coast of Virginia conducting carrier qualifications.

December 15, A ceremony remarking the 100th Anniversary Gala of the Navy's Great White Fleet was held aboard the Theodore Roosevelt in Naval Station Norfolk. Sixteen battleships departed Hampton Roads for a 14-month global voyage to test naval readiness, establish global presence, and generate international goodwill, Dec. 15, 1907. The deployment included 14,000 Sailors and covered 43,000 miles. The participating ships, painted white, later became known as the "Great White Fleet."

December 20, The Roosevelt returned to homeport after a three-day underway for CQ.

January 11, 2008 Capt. C. Ladd Wheeler relieved Capt. J.R. Haley as commanding officer of the USS Theodore Roosevelt.

February 8, The TR returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a two-week underway for CQ and ammunition onload with the USNS Mount Baker (T-AE 34), transferring approximately three million pounds of supplies and ordnance Underway for Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM) CQ in the Jacksonville Op. Area on Feb. 29.

March 9, Ship's Serviceman 3rd Class George Earl Thompson, Jr., assigned to the "Big Stick", died in Shands Trauma Center in Jacksonville, shortly after arrival, from a severe head injury he received when the aircraft carrier encountered heavy seas off the coast of Florida Returned home on March 11.

March 17, CVN 71 departed Norfolk for a 23-day underway to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability and Final Evaluation Problem (TSTA/FEP).

March 24, A Sailor, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 213, fell overboard during flight operations, 66 nautical miles from Mayport, Fla., around 21.30 local time. USS Mason (DDG 87) launched an rigid-hill inflatable boat (RHIB), which rescued the crewmember five minutes later.

April 18, Adm. William J. Fallon retired, after a 41 years of service, in a ceremony abord the Theodore Roosevelt. Fallon's final assignment was commander of U.S. Central Command from March 16, 2007, through March 11, 2008, and was the first naval officer to hold the position, which commands all U.S. forces in the Middle East.

April 24, USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG departed Norfolk for a 22-day Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

April 26, Capt. Daniel N. Dixon, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, completed his 1,000th successful arrested landing aboard the TR.

May 23, CVN 71 completed four days of carrier qualifications for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS), qualifying pilots assigned to the "Gladiators" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 106. Underway again for FRS Carrier Qualifications (CQ) from June 6-14.

July 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt and USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) Carrier Strike Groups, along with British aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal (RO 7), the Brazilian Navy frigate Greenhalgh (F46) and the French submarine FS Amethyste (S 605), are currently participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 08-4 "Operation Brimstone", from July 21-31 off the eastern U.S. coast from Virginia to Florida. French Rafale fighter aircraft assigned to the 12th Squadron, and Hawkeye early warning aircraft assigned to the 4th Squadron will conduct CQ and cyclic flight operations with the CVW-8 during the exercise. This marks the first integrated U.S. and French carrier qualifications aboard a U.S. aircraft carrier.

From August 2-8, The TR was underway for routine training and Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE).

September 8, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

October 3, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Cape Town, South Africa, for a four-day port visit, the first by an U.S. aircraft carrier since USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CV 42) in 1967.

October 9, The Theodore Roosevelt and Monterey (CG 61) participated in a one-day theater security cooperation (TSC) exercise, with three South African ships and one French Navy ship, while underway in the Indian Ocean.

October 10, An Aviation Boatswain&rsquos Mate 3rd Class was blown by jet blast to another parked aircraft, while the carrier was conducting night flight operations, around 10.40 p.m. local, 353 nautical miles from the southern tip of Madagascar. The man sustained open wounds to his face with multiple bone fractures.

October 18, The aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, from the station in the North Arabian Sea. Transited the Strait of Hormuz on Nov. 14.

November 15, USS Theodore Roosevely pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a three-day port call.

November 19, Cmdr. Daniel "Retch" Buckon relieved Cmdr. Curt "Opie" Seth, as CO of "Tomcatters" of the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 31 during an aeriel change-of-command ceremony.

December 17, Cmdr. David J. Bryson relieved Cmdr. Michael D. McKenna as CO of "Shadowhawks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 141, during an aeriel change-of-command ceremony in the Gulf of Oman.

January 29, 2009 The TR recently departed Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, after another liberty port visit to Dubai.

February 4, The two F/A-18 Hornet pilots, assigned to "Golden Warriors" VFA-87, accidentally touched during flight operations over the Arabian Sea on Feb. 2. The jets safely returned to the Roosevelt. Neither pilot was injured, and both have been removed from flight status while the incident is evaluated.

March 4, Cmdr. Richard "Cheese" McGrath, Jr., relieved Cmdr. Richard "Miggs" Zins as CO of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87, during an aeriel change-of-command ceremony in the Gulf of Oman.

March 9, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with USS Lake Champlain (CG 57) and USCGC Boutwell (WHEC 719), is currently participating in international naval exercise Aman 2009, off the coast of Pakistan, from March 5-14.

March 21, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) relieved USS Theodore Roosevelt in the Gulf of Oman as part of a normal rotation of forces and marked the end of the Roosevelt Strike Group's deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations (AoO). Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 flew 3,105 combat sorties into Afghanistan and dropped more than 61,000 pounds of ordnance.

April 3, Fireman Amber Latricia Winbourne died from sudden cardiac arrest, while the TR was underway in the English Channel.

April 4, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Portsmouth, England, for a four-day port visit after providing air cover for U.S. President Barack Obama&rsquos first official visit to the United Kingdom during the G20 Summit.

April 18, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to homeport after more than a seven-month deployment.

May 19, The Theodore Roosevelt is currently underway for ammunition offload with the USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8).

May 30, The "Big Stick" departed Naval Station Norfolk for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

August 26, U.S. Navy has awarded Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding a $2.4 billion contract for a major overhaul of USS Theodore Roosevelt. The work includes the re-fueling of the ship's reactors, as well as extensive modernization work to more than 2,300 compartments, 600 tanks and hundreds of systems. In addition, major upgrades will be made to the flight deck, catapults, combat systems and the carrier's "island."

August 29, USS Theodore Roosevelt arrived in Newport News Shipyard for a 36-month Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH).

July 28, 2010 Capt. William J. Hart relieved Capt. C. Ladd Wheeler as CO of the CVN 71 during a change-of-command ceremony at Fort Monroe in Hampton, Va.

October 8, Northrop Grumman Corporation completed a significant milestone on the TR with the installation of the 010 level of the ship's island.

December 5, Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding completed another milestone with the installation of the ship's propulsion shafting and propeller installation.

February 24, 2011 NGSB completed a significant work performance milestone on the USS Theodore Roosevelt with the installation of the final section of the ship's main mast.

May 21, CVN 71 moved to a pier side location at Huntington Ingalls Industries Newport News Shipbuilding after a 20-month dry dock period.

February 28, 2013 Capt. Daniel C. Grieco relieved Capt. William J. Hart as CO of the Theodore Roosevelt during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Newport News, Va.

August 25, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Newport News shipyard for sea trials after an extended 48-month RCOH Returned to Naval Station Norfolk on Aug. 29.

September 11, The TR departed Norfolk for a nine-day underway to conduct flight deck certification and carrier qualifications with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1. The Strike Fighter Attack Squadron (VFA) 204, stationed at Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans, conducted CQ from Sept. 16-20. This was the first time that "River Rattlers" conducted flight operations aboard the aircraft carrier in 10 years.

October 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for an 11-day underway to conduct FRS/TRACOM CQ.

November 8, CVN 71 departed Naval Station Norfolk for an 11-day underway to conduct testing with the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator (UCAS-D) and F/A-18C Hornets, assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, in the VACAPES Op. Area.

December 3, An E-2D Hawkeye, assigned to "Tiger Tails" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, conducted flight operations for the first time aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt. The aircraft carrier recently departed Norfolk for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-1 and Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM) Returned home on Dec. 15.

January 15, 2014 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a three-week underway to conduct FRS/TRACOM CQ and engineering training Underway for sea trials after a two-month Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV) from April 8-11 Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ and ammo onload with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) from April 28- May 9 Underway for Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials (CSSQT) from May 19-24.

June 2, The Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Station Norfolk for an 11-day underway to conduct Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) Preps. and FRS/TRACOM CQ Underway for INSURV assessment from June 24-25 Underway for FRS Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and Group Sail on July 10 Conducted ammo onload with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) on July 16 Returned home on July 17.

August 16, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a 10-day underway to conduct first cooperative launch and recovery operations with the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator (UCAS-D) and F/A-18 Hornets and to conduct TRACOM CQ Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 27 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the CVW-1 on Sept. 18.

September 29, The TR assisted Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) vessel 38 in the rescue of the two fishermen early morning, after a fire destroyer their boat, about 90 miles off the coast of Florida Returned to Norfolk on Oct. 10 Held an "Open House" on Oct. 18 Underway for FRS/TRACOM CQ on Oct. 27.

October 29, The first MV-22B Osprey, assigned to the "Argonauts" of Marine Tiltrotor Test and Evaluation Squadron (VMX) 22, landed on board the Theodore Roosevelt.

November 12, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk after a 16-day underway in the Virginia Capes and Jacksonville Op. Areas.

January 8, 2015 The Theodore Roosevelt departed Norfolk for a month-long underway to conduct Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) from Jan. 9-10.

January 15, The flight deck of USS Theodore Roosevelt tallied it's 200,000th arrested landing with the trap of an F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 and piloted by CO Capt. Daniel Grieco and DCAG Capt. Benjamin "Pizza" Hewlett .

March 11, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Pier 14, Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment and a homeport change to San Diego, Calif., after a two-day delay due to clogged seawater intake valve. This is first deployment for E-2D Advanced Hawkeye aircraft.

March 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt anchored in Central Solent at Charlie Ancorage, off Stokes Bay, Gosport, for a five-day port visit to Portsmouth Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on March 31.

April 6, The Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12 entered the Red Sea after transiting Suez Canal Conducted turnover with the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) CSG in the Gulf of Oman on April 13 Entered the Arabian Gulf on April 14.

April 16, Capt. Benjamin L. Hewlett relieved Capt. William L. Ewald as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1 during an aeriel change-of-command ceremony. The TR launched today its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militants.

April 19, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with USS Normandy (CG 60), transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound to increase the naval presence in the Gulf of Aden and Arabian Sea in response to current instability in Yemen Transited northbound on April 24.

April 28, Cmdr. Craig D. Bangor relieved Cmdr. Joshua A. Sager as CO of the "Red Rippers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11, during an aeriel change-of-command ceremony.

April 29, Cmdr. Jeffrey Montgomery relieved Cmdr. Christopher M. Bahner as CO of the "Rooks" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 137, during an aeriel change-of-command ceremony.

May 4, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 5, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a four-day liberty port visit to Manama.

May 12, An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Fighting Checkmates" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 211, crashed in the Arabian Gulf, around 3.30 p.m. local time, shortly after launching from the USS Theodore Roosevelt. Both pilots ejected safely and were returned to the ship.

May 31, Lt. Col. Nicholas O. Neimer relieved Lt. Col. Joshua A. Riggs as CO of the "Thunderbolts" of Marine Strike Fighter Squadron (VMFA) 251, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Theodore Roosevelt.

June 7, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at the newly-constructed Container Terminal 3 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

June 18, A Sailor fell overboard at 9.22 p.m. local time, while the aircraft carrier was underway in the Central Arabian Gulf, and was rescued approximately half an hour later by an SH-60F Seahawk, assigned to the Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11.

June 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt participated in a Photo Exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Normandy (CG 60), USS Farragut (DDG 99), USS Paul Hamilton (DDG 60), USS McFaul (DDG 74) and HMS Duncan (D37), while underway in the Central Arabian Gulf, after completed a 10-day FLEETEX.

July 19, CVN 71 moored at Berth 6, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) for a four-day liberty visit to Manama, Bahrain.

July 21, Capt. Craig A. Clapperton relieved Capt. Daniel C. Grieco as the 14th CO of Theodore Roosevelt during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at KBSP. Also, Rear Adm. Roy J. Kelley relieved Rear Adm. Andrew L. Lewis as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 12 in a ceremony today.

August 31, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 6, Khalifa Bin Salman Port for a six-day port visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

September 3, Vice Adm. Kevin M. Donegan relieved Vice Adm. John W. Miller as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. 5th Fleet/Combined Maritime Forces (CMF) during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the TR at KBSP.

October 4, The Theodore Roosevelt pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on Oct. 9.

While on station in the Arabian Gulf, TR launched 1,812 combat sorties and expended 1,085 precision-guided munitions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

October 16, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with USS Normandy, recently arrived off the east coast of India to participate in annual multinational exercise Malabar through Oct. 19. USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) and USS City of Corpus Christi (SSN 705) are also participating.

October 24, The Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a four-day port visit Transited the Balabac Strait eastbound on Oct. 31 Transited westbound on Nov. 4.

November 5, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with the USS Normandy and USS Lassen (DDG 82), transited the South China Sea, south of the Spratly archipelago and about 70 nautical miles north of Malaysia, as a "show of force . " Transited the Surigao Strait northbound on Nov. 7.

November 15, CVN 71 moored at Pier H3/H4 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a two-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

November 23, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Kilo Pier, Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego for the first time, following an eight-and-a-half month combat deployment.

December 12, The Theodore Roosevelt moved from Kilo Pier to Berth Lima, Carrier Wharf Returned to Kilo Pier on Jan. 15.

February 20, 2016 The "Big Stick" departed San Diego for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-17 Conducted ammo offload with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) from Feb. 25-26 Conducted FRS-CQ from March 3-5 Anchored off Coronado for a brief stop to conduct anchoring training on March 7 Returned home on March 8 Moved to Juliet Pier on May 2.

December 8, USS Theodore Roosevelt moved to Kilo Pier, NAS North Island following a seven-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) Underway for sea trials from Dec. 19-21.

January 17, 2017 The Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth L, NAS North Island after a five-day underway for routine training Underway for flight deck certification and CQ with the CVW-17 from Jan. 18-27 Underway for ammo onload with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) from Jan. 30- Feb. 6 Underway for FRS-CQ from Feb. 9-13.

March 2, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth L, NAS North Island after a 15-day underway for routine training Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) on April 8.

April 11, Cmdr. Adrian W. Jope relieved Cmdr. Eric C. Doyle as CO of the "Stingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

April 13, Cmdr. Lawrence Nance relieved Cmdr. Joshua F. Wenker as CO of the "Sun Kings" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 116, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

May 1, USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG-9 commenced a Group Sail training unit exercise off the coast of southern California Participated in a missile exercise (MISSILEX) from May 9-10 Moored at Berth L, NAS North Island on May 12.

June 12, The Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a one-day underway to conduct Mid-Cycle Material Assessment (MCMA) with the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV), following a four-week Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

June 16, Rear Adm. Steve T. Koehler relieved Rear Adm. Jay S. Bynum as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the "Big Stick."

June 19, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed NAS North Island for a Friends and Family Day Cruise Underway for FRS-CQ from June 22-28.

July 27, Capt. Carlos A. Sardiello relieved Capt. Craig A. Clapperton as CO of the Theodore Roosevelt during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Kilo Pier.

August 30, Cmdr. Thomas T. Bodine relieved Cmdr. Robert D. Quinn, III as CO of the "Fighting Redcocks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

August 31, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth L, NAS North Island after a 30-day underway for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

September 15, Vice Adm. John D. Alexander relieved Vice Adm. Nora W. Tyson as Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 71.

October 5, Cmdr. Ladislao R. Montero relieved Cmdr. David W. Skarosi as CO of the "Cougars" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 139, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the TR.

October 6, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment.

October 26, The Theodore Roosevelt transited 1 mile south of Wake Island to participate in U.S. Navy Heritage event.

October 31, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port visit Transited the Korean Strait northbound on Nov. 11.

November 12, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with the USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), USS Preble (DDG 88) and USS Sampson (DDG 102), participated in two photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Ronald Regan (CVN 76), USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS Princeton (CG 59), USS Stethem (DDG 63), USS Chafee (DDG 90), JS Ise (DDH 182), JS Inazuma (DD 105), JS Makinami (DD 112), ROKS Sejong The Great (DDG 991), ROKS Yu Seoung Ryoung (DDG 993) and four other ROK Navy ships, as a "show of force" in the Sea of Japan.

November 14, USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG recently transited the Korean Strait southbound Transited the Luzon Strait westbound on Nov. 16 Transited the Strait of Singapore on Nov. 19 Arrived in the Central Command AoO on Nov. 27 Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Nov. 29.

December 1, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

December 6, Cmdr. James P. Jerome relieved Cmdr. Joshua C. Ellison as CO of the "Indians" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 6, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

December 7, Aircraft from CVW-17 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Freedom's Sentinel in Afghanistan, while the TR was underway in the Arabian Gulf.

December 24, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 58/59, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

January 26, 2018 USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 6, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) for a four-day liberty visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

March 2, Cmdr. Nicholas C. Smetana relieved Cmdr. Joseph A. Pommerer as CO of the "Mighty Shrikes" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 94, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

March 3, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 58/59, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on March 21.

March 25, The Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the INS Tarkash (F50), while transiting off the southwest coast of India Transited the Malacca Strait southbound from April 1-2.

April 2, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth 3/4, RSS Singapura (The ex-Changi Naval Base) for a four-day liberty port visit to Singapore Participated in a PASSEX with the RSS Supreme (FFG 73) and RSS Valiant (PGG 91) on April 6.

April 11, CVN 71 anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a three-day liberty port visit.

April 15, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with the USS Bunker Hill and USS Preble, transited the Verde Island Passage eastbound on early Sunday, just after midnight Transited the San Bernardino Strait northbound on April 15.

April 18, The Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea, with the USNS Matthew Perry (T-AKE 9), while underway north of Guam Conducted ammo offload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) from April 23-24 Moored at Pier H3/H4 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, from April 27- May 1.

May 7, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Juliet Pier on Naval Air Station North Island following a seven-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

June 8, Huntington Ingalls Industries, Newport News, Va., was awarded a $15,5 million modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-13-C-4315) for the USS Theodore Roosevelt's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Work is expected to be completed by January 2019.

July 15, The Theodore Roosevelt commenced a six-month availability while moored at Juliet Pier Underway for sea trials from Dec. 19-21.

January 30, 2019 USS Theodore Roosevelt moved from Juliet Pier to Berth Lima on Naval Air Station North Island Underway for flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 from Feb. 20-28 Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ from March 1-7 Underway for Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM) CQ from March 9-13 Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ from April 26-30.

May 6, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed Naval Air Station North Island to participate in a joint exercise Northern Edge 2019, in the Gulf of Alaska Underway off the coast of Kenai Penninsula from May 12-23 Returned home on May 30.

June 14, Rear Adm. Stuart P. Baker relieved Rear Adm. Daniel W. Dwyer as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 71.

June 27, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed homeport for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP) with the CVW-11 Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) from June 28-29 Moored at Berth Lima on Aug. 2 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 13 Moved to Juliet Pier on Aug. 14.

September 27, Vice Adm. Scott D. Conn relieved Vice Adm. John D. Alexander as Commander, U.S. 3rd Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Roosevelt.

October 30, USS Theodore Roosevelt moved from Juliet Pier back to Berth Lima following a two-month Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

November 1, Capt. Brett E. Crozier relieved Capt. Carlos A. Sardiello as the 16th CO of CVN 71 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

November 15, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth L on Naval Air Station North Island after a two-day underway for routine training Underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) from Nov. 19- Dec. 16.

January 17, 2020 USS Theodore Roosevelt departed San Diego for a scheduled Indo-Pacific deployment.

January 28, The Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), while underway off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7) on Feb. 4.

February 7, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a three-day liberty port visit Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos (T-AO 197) on Feb. 13.

February 15, USS Theodore Roosevelt participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS America (LHA 6), USS Germantown (LSD 42) and USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), while underway southeast of Okinawa Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos on Feb. 26 Transited the Luzon Strait westbound on March 1.?

March 5, The Theodore Roosevelt anchored off the coast of Tien Sa Port in Da Nang, Vietnam, for a four-day port visit.

March 15, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with the USS Bunker Hill and USS Russell (DDG 59), participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS America, USS Green Bay (LPD 20) and USS McCampbell (DDG 85), while underway in the South China Sea as a "show of force" Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) on March 17.

March 24, USS Theodore Roosevelt participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS America, USS Green Bay, USS Germantown (LSD 42), USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19), USS Bunker Hill and USS Mustin (DDG 89), while underway in the Philippine Sea Moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, on March 27.

April 2, Rear Adm. Stuart P. Baker, Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 relieved of duty Capt. Brett E. Crozier for "allowing the complexity of his challenge with coronavirus breakout on the ship to overwhelm his ability to act professionally." The XO Capt. Danniel J. Keeler assumed temporary command of the TR Capt. Carlos A. Sardiello assumed command on April 6.

May 21, USS Theodore Roosevelt, with a scaled-back crew of about 3,000 Sailors, departed Apra Harbor to conduct training and carrier qualifications after piersided for 55 days. Approximately 1,800 Sailors are still left in quarantine on Naval Base Guam and nearby hotels, foolowing a COVID-19 outbreak that infected almost a quarter of the crew.

June 1, The Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Pecos, while underway off the west coast of Guam Moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor again, to embark the recovered crew members, from June 3-4.

June 9, Rear Adm. Douglas C. Verissimo relieved Rear Adm. Stuart P. Baker as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the TR.

June 13, USS Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11) and USNS Pecos, while underway in the Guam Op. Area.

June 18, An F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Black Knights" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 154, crashed in the Philippine Sea while conducting a routine pilot proficiency training. Both crewmembers ejected safely and were recovered by an MH-60S Seahawk.

June 22, USS Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Washington Chambers, while underway northeast of Guam Participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Bunker Hill, USS Russell and USS Nimitz (CVN 68) CSG, as a "show of force," on June 23 Transited eastbound, off the coast of Wake Island, on June 26 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Henry J. Kaiser (T-AO 187), while underway in the vicinity of Oahu, Hawaii, on July 1.

July 2, Aviation Electronics Technician Chief Petty Officer Justin Calderone suffered a "medical emergency," early Thursday morning, aboard the Roosevelt and was transferred to a military medical facility in Oahu, where he was pronounced dead.

July 9, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth Lima on Naval Air Station North Island following a nearly six-month deployment.

July 31, Capt. Eric J. Anduze relieved Capt. Carlos A. Sardiello as the 18th CO of Theodore Roosevelt during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

September 29, The Theodore Roosevelt moored at Berth Lima after a six-day underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ.

October 2, Vice Adm. Kenneth R. Whitesell relieved Vice Adm. DeWolfe H. Miller, III as Commander, Naval Air Forces during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 71.

October 13, Seaman Isaiah Glenn Silvio Peralta suffered a self-inflicted gunshot wound, around 8 a.m. local time, while standing security watch on Berth Lima. He was taken to San Diego Medical Center and was later pronounced dead.

October 17, USS Theodore Roosevelt returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a four-day underway in the SOCAL Op. Area.

December 7, USS Theodore Roosevelt departed San Diego for a surge Indo-Pacific deployment.

December 10, Aviation Ordnanceman Airman Apprentice Ethan Goolsby was lost at sea around 7:30 a.m. local time, while the TR was underway approximately 70 n.m. southwest of San Diego.

December 17, Cmdr. Andrew M. Imperatore relieved Cmdr. Shannon Thompson as CO of the "Gray Wolves" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 142, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway off the coast of southern California.

December 23, USS Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 departed SOCAL Op. Area after participated in a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Guadalupe (T-AO 200), while underway west of Oahu, Hawaii, on Jan. 1 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10) from Jan. 8-9.

January 15, 2021 USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with the USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and USS John Finn (DDG 113), participated in a PHOTOEX with the JS Asahi (DD 119) and JS Kongo (DDG 173), while underway in the Philippine Sea in the vicinity of Okidaitojima Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194) and USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) on Jan. 16 and 22nd.

January 23, USS Theodore Roosevelt, along with the USS Bunker Hill and USS Russell (DDG 59), transited the Luzon Strait westbound Transited eastbound on Jan. 2? Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Charles Drew on Jan. 28.

January 31, The Theodore Roosevelt moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard (T-AKE 3) on Feb. 7.

February 9, USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68), USS Princeton (CG 59), USS Sterett (DDG 104) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56), while underway as a "show of force" off the northwest coast of Philippines Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Yukon (T-AO 202) on Feb. 10.

February 23, CVN 71 conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS John Ericsson (T-AO 194), while underway in the Philippine Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again, while underway off the northwest coast of Guam, on Feb. 25 Participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Bunker Hill, JS Yugiri (DD 153), JS Setoyuki (TV 3518) and JS Hatakaze (TV 3520) on Feb. 28.

March 2, Cmdr. Daniel J. Thomas relieved Cmdr. Brian A. Jamison as CO of the "Eightballers" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the TR.

March 3, USS Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) and USNS John Ericsson, while underway in the Philippine Sea Entered the Celebes Sea on March ? Transited the Makassar Strait southbound on March 8 Transited the Lombok Strait on March 9.

March 15, The Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Guadalupe, while underway south of Java, Indonesia Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Alan Shepard on March 20 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Guadalupe, while underway west of Sumatra, on March 26 Participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Bunker Hill, USS Russell (DDG 59) and INS Shivalik (F47) on March 28.

March 31, The Theodore Roosevelt conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the HMAS Sirius (O 266), while underway in the Indian Ocean Transited the Malacca Strait southbound from April 3-4 Transited the Strait of Singapore eastbound on April 4 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Guadalupe on April 8.

April 9, USS Theodore Roosevelt CSG participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Makin Island (LHD 8), USS San Diego (LPD 22) and USS Port Royal (CG 73) while underway as a "show of force" in the southern South China Sea Moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, from April 16-17 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Cesar Chavez and USNS Guadalupe on April 21.

May 3, The Theodore Roosevelt CSG commenced its participation in a biennial exercise Northern Edge, while underway south of Aleutian Islands Arrived in the SOCAL Op. Area on May 19 Conducted ammo offload with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4) from May 21-22.

May 25, USS Theodore Roosevelt moored at Juliet Pier on Naval Air Station North Island following a five-and-a-half month deployment.


Post-war service

The Maritime Commission transferred the ship to the United States Army which named her USAT General Hugh J. Gaffey. She served the Army Transport Service until 1 March 1950 when the Navy re-acquired her. Retaining her Army name, the transport was not re-commissioned, but instead was assigned to the Military Sea Transportation Service and manned by a civil service crew. USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey (T-AP-121) spent almost two decades carrying men and material to American installations throughout the Far East and the Pacific Ocean. Transported troops and accompanying families to and from overseas assignments in Guam, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Okinawa. [1]


Warship Wednesday Sept. 30, 2015: The Deseret Battlewagon

Here at LSOZI, we are going to take off every Wednesday for a look at the old steam/diesel navies of the 1859-1946 time period and will profile a different ship each week. These ships have a life, a tale all of their own, which sometimes takes them to the strangest places. – Christopher Eger

Warship Wednesday Sept. 30, 2015: The Deseret Battlewagon

Utah as she appeared in World War One (click image to big up). At the time she was the flag of the 6th Battleship Division and carried a unique camo pattern that included the white triangular veins shown here Photo colorized by irootoko_jr

Here we see the Florida-class dreadnought USS Utah (BB-31/AG-16) as she appeared during World War I. While she went “Over There” and was ready to fight the Germans yet never fired a shot, her follow-on experience in the next world war would be much different.

The period of U.S. battleship development from the USS Indiana (Battleship No. 1) in 1890, until Florida was ordered in 1908 saw a staggering 29 huge capital ships built in under two decades. While the majority of those vessels were pre-dreadnought Monopoly battleships (for instance, Indiana was 10,500-tons and carried 2 × twin 13″/35 guns), the U.S. had gotten in the dreadnought business with the two smallish 16,000-ton, 8合 inch/45 caliber gunned South Carolina-class ships ordered in 1905, followed by a pair of larger 22,400-ton, 10合 inch/45 gunned Delaware-class battleships in 1907.

The pair of Florida-class ships were better than the U.S. battleships before them but rapidly eclipsed by the 33 that came after and developmentally were sandwiched between the old and new era. Dimensionally, they were more than twice as heavy as the country’s first battleships and only half as heavy as the last commissioned in 1944.

At 25,000 tons, they carried roughly the same battery of 12 inchers (10x12″/45 caliber Mark 5 guns) in six twin turrets as the Delawares, which were equivalent to the period Royal Navy’s BL 12 inch Mk X naval gun and the Japanese Type 41 12-inch (305 mm) /45 caliber naval gun. Utah was the last battleship mounted with this particular model gun.

Crew of Turret I on USS Utah B-31 in 1913 U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 103835 via Navweaps

Their belt, an almost homogenous 11-inches everywhere, was thick for the time and they could make 21-knots on a quartet of Parsons steam turbines powered by a full dozen Babcock & Wilcox coal-fired boilers.

Laid down 9 March 1909 at New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Utah was first (and, until this week, only) ship named after the former State of Deseret.

Commissioned 31 August 1911, her early career was a series of training and goodwill cruises. Then the gloves came off.

In April, 1914, Utah was heavily involved in Mr. Wilson’s intervention in the affairs of Mexico, ordered to seize the German-flagged steamer SS Ypiranga, and loaded with good Krupp and Mauser guns for old man Huerta.

This led to the battle for and subsequent occupation of Veracruz where Utah and her sistership Florida landed two provisional battalions consisting of 502 Marines and 669 bluejackets (many of whose white uniforms were dyed brown with coffee grounds) to fight their way to the Veracruz Naval Academy. Utah‘s 384 sailors gave hard service, pushing street by street and tackling the Mexican barricades. In the fighting, the fleet suffered

100 casualties while the Mexicans took nearly five times that number.

Formal raising of first flag of U.S. Veracruz 2 P.M. April 27, 1914 by sailors and Marines of the Utah and Florida

As the crisis abated, Utah sailed away two months later for the first of her many refits.

When the U.S. entered WWI in 1917, Utah spent most of the conflict as an engineering school training ship in Chesapeake Bay. then in August 1918 sailed for Ireland where she was stationed in Bantry Bay to keep an eye peeled for German surface raiders.

After her fairly pedestrian war service, she and Florida had their dozen coal eaters replaced with a quartet of more efficient White-Forster oil-fired boilers, which allowed one funnel to be removed. Their AAA suite was likewise increased.

Battleship Number 31, USS Utah, at rest in Guatanamo Bay, Cuba, January 1920.

One bluejacket who served aboard her in 1922 as a Fireman 3rd Class assigned was a fellow by the name of John Herbert Dillinger, but he deserted after a few months when Utah was docked in Boston and was eventually dishonorably discharged before becoming Public Enemy No. 1.

Despite the cranky Mr. Dilinger, Utah was a happy ship in the 1920s, completing a number of goodwill cruises to South America and Europe including a trip in 1928 with President-Elect Herbert Hoover aboard.

While the ships survived the cuts of the Washington Naval Treaty, the ax of the follow-on London Naval Treaty fell and, when compared to the newer hulls in the battleship fleet, Utah and Florida were found lacking although they were only 15

years old and recently modernized.

As such, class leader Florida was decommissioned in February 1931 and towed to the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, where she was broken up for scrap.

As for Utah, she was decommissioned, pulled from the battle fleet, disarmed and converted to a radio-controlled target ship, designated AG-16 on 1 July 1931. She was capable of being operated completely by remote control with a skeleton crew.

Her electric motors, operated by signals from the controlling ship, opened and closed throttle valves, moved her steering gear, and regulated the supply of oil to her boilers. In addition, a Sperry gyro pilot kept the ship on course.

Able to operate with her much-reduced crew buttoned up inside her protective armor with every hatch dogged, her decks were reinforced with a double layer of 6″x12″ plank timbers to keep inert practice bombs from damaging the ship. Her funnel likewise was given a steel cap. Sandbags and cement patches covered hard-to-plank areas.

Photographed by George Winstead, probably immediately after her recommissioning on 1 April 1932, when Utah (AG-16) departed Norfolk on to train her engineers in using the new installations and for trials of her radio gear by which the ship could be controlled at varying rates of speed and changes of course maneuvers that a ship would conduct in battle. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Text courtesy of DANFS. Via Navsource

No longer considered a capital ship befitting flag officers, her 102-piece silver service, purchased by donation from 30,000 schoolchildren of Utah (and each piece with an image of Brigham Young on it), was sent back to the state for safekeeping.

While her main and secondary armament was landed, she was equipped with a battery of 1.1-inch quads and later some 5″/38 cal DP, 5″/25, 20mm and .50 cal mounts to help train anti-aircraft gunners. To keep said small guns from being whacked away by falling practice bombs, they had to be dismantled and stored below decks when not in use or covered with timber “doghouses.”

Utah as target ship entering pearl harbor in 1939

This armament constantly shifted with the needs of the Navy. In August 1941 she was considerably re-armed for her work as a AAA training vessel.

She carried two 5in/25 mounts forward atop No.1 and No.2 turrets respectively. Two 5in/38 mounts to port atop the port aircastle with two 5in/25s in the same position on the starboard aircastle. (The `aircastles’ are the projecting casemates abreast the bridge area for the former secondary battery). On the 01 level abeam the bridge, a quad 1.1 inch gun was carried on both sides of the ship. Aft, came two more 5in/38s atop No.4 and No.5 turrets, this time enclosed with gun shields. Finally, four Oerlikon 20mm (later scheduled to be replaced by 40mm Bofors) and eight 0.50-calibre guns completed the ensemble. An advanced gun director and stereoscopic range-finder was mounted on the top of No.3 turret and anti-aircraft and 5-inch directors fitted on the foremast area

Note her missing guns, funnel cap and extensive extra decking

She was in roughly this configuration on the Day that will live in Infamy. Note the 5/38s rear and 5/25s forward. These were covered with heavy wooden ‘dog houses’ on Dec. 7th

Used in fleet maneuvers in the Pacific for a decade, she was resting near Battleship Row on Dec. 7, 1941.

Ironically, she was scheduled to leave Hawaii for the West Coast on Dec. 8th.

The attacking Japanese pilots in the Pearl Harbor attack had been ordered not to waste their bombs and torpedoes on the old target ship, but it has been theorized some excited aviators mistook the gleaming wooden planks on her decking to be that of an American flattop. Further, she was berthed on the Northwest side of Ford Island where visiting aircraft carriers were usually tied up on the weekends.

As such, Utah received two (perhaps three) Japanese torpedoes in the first wave of the attack.

Painting by the artist Wayne Scarpaci showing the Utah (AG-16) being torpedoed

Not retrofitted with torpedo bilges as other WWI-era U.S. battleships were, the Emperor’s fish penetrated her hull and she soon capsized, taking 64 of her sailors with her– 54 of which were trapped inside her hull and to this day never recovered.

It went quick for the old battleship. The attack began at 7:55 a.m. and by 8:11 Utah was reported to have turned turtle, her masts embedded in the harbor bottom.

One of those 64 was Chief Watertender Peter Tomich, a Bosnian immigrant who served in the U.S. Army in WWI before enlisting for a career in the Navy. Tomich saved lives that day.

Although realizing that the ship was capsizing, as a result of enemy bombing and torpedoing, Chief Watertender Tomich remained at his post in the engineering plant of the U.S.S. UTAH (AG-16), until he saw that all boilers were secured and all fireroom personnel had left their stations, and by so doing lost his own life.

Navy hardhat salvage divers made 437 dives on the stricken ship during her attempted re-righting in 1944, involving 2,227 man-hours under pressure. However, she was never fully salvaged. She was stricken from the Naval List 13 November, 1944 and is currently preserved as a war grave. A further move to salvage her in the 1950s was stillborn.

Utah‘s ships bell is located on the campus of the University of Utah and is maintained by the campus NROTC unit.

Her silver service is maintained along with other artifacts in Salt Lake City at the Governor’s Mansion.

Utah persists to this day at her berth along Ford Island leaking oil into Pearl Harbor.

She is preserved as the USS Utah Memorial and the National Park Service, U.S. Navy and other stakeholders take her remains very seriously, mounting a color guard daily.

Underwater Photographer Captures Images of USS Utah Memorial. Shaan Hurley, a technologist from Autodesk, takes photographs of the USS Utah Memorial during a data-collecting evolution in Pearl Harbor, October 23, 2014. In a process called “photogrametry” the underwater photos will be inputted into computer software that will create 3D data models of the photographed areas. The National Park Service is working with several companies and agencies to gather data points to create an accurate 3D model of the ship. U.S. Navy video by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Brett Cote / RELEASED

Today she is remembered by a veteran’s group and survivors association of which there are only seven known remaining survivors. A number of those who have passed have been cremated and had their ashes interred in the wreck.

Members of the Navy Region Hawaii Ceremonial Guard march in formation at the conclusion of a ceremony in honor Pearl Harbor survivor Lt. Wayne Maxwell at the USS Utah Memorial on historic Ford Island. Maxwell was a 30-year Navy veteran and former crew member of the Farragut-class destroyer USS Aylwin during the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. He was 93.

As for Chief Tomich, he was something of an orphan and his award is the only Medal of Honor since the Indian Campaigns in the late 1800s that has never been awarded either to a living recipient, or surviving family member. The state of Utah, who pronounced him a resident posthumously, long had custody of his award.

USS Tomich (DE-242), an Edsall-class destroyer escort, was named in his honor in 1942 and remained on the Naval List until 1972.

In 1989, the U.S. Navy built the Senior Enlisted Academy in Newport, R.I., and named the building Tomich Hall. Chief Tomich’s Medal of Honor is on display on the quarterdeck there.

Finally, this week, SECNAV Ray Mabus announced in Salt Lake City that SSN-801, a Virginia-class submarine under construction, will be the second vessel to carry the name Utah.

Plan, 1932 Via Navsource, notice one stack, no main guns

Displacement: Standard: 21,825 long tons (22,175 t), full load 25,000
Length: 521 ft. 8 in (159.00 m)
Beam: 88 ft. 3 in (26.90 m)
Draft: 28.3 ft. (8.6 m)
Installed power: 28,000 shp (21,000 kW)
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 4 screws. 12 Coal boilers later replaced by 4 oil boilers in 1926.
Speed: 21 knots (39 km/h 24 mph)
Range: 5,776 nmi (6,650 mi 10,700 km) at 10 kn (12 mph, 19 km/h) and 2,760 nmi (3,180 mi 5,110 km) at 20 kn (23 mph, 37 km/h)
Coal: 2,500 tons (2,268 tonnes)
Complement: 1,001 officers and men as designed, 575 after 1932
Armament:
(1931)

10 × 12 in (30 cm)/45 cal guns
16 × 5 in (127 mm)/51 cal guns
2 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes

4࡫″/38 DP in single mounts
4࡫″/25 in single mounts
8ࡧ.1″ AAA in two quad mounts
4x20mm/80 in singles
15x.50-cal singles, water-cooled

Armor:
Belt: 9–11 in (229–279 mm)
Lower casemate: 8–10 in (203–254 mm)
Upper casemate: 5 in (127 mm)
Barbettes: 4–10 in (102–254 mm)
Turret face: 12 in (305 mm)
Conning tower: 11.5 in (292 mm)
Decks: 1.5 in (38 mm), later reinforced with wooden planks, sandbags and concrete.

If you liked this column, please consider joining the International Naval Research Organization (INRO), Publishers of Warship International

They are possibly one of the best sources of naval study, images, and fellowship you can find http://www.warship.org/

The International Naval Research Organization is a non-profit corporation dedicated to the encouragement of the study of naval vessels and their histories, principally in the era of iron and steel warships (about 1860 to date). Its purpose is to provide information and a means of contact for those interested in warships.

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Watch the video: Orca Class Patrol Craft Training vessel Renard PCT 58 being towed for a Docking Work Period (January 2023).

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